•  LonghornsCareer and Technical Education Courses

    Marketing Principles
    Marketing Principles addresses the ways in which marketing satisfies consumer and organizational needs and wants for products and services. Students develop an understanding of basic marketing concepts and the role of marketing and business. They develop skills in applying economic concepts to marketing, distribution, and logistics, marketing research, product/service planning, pricing, advertising  strategies, and personal selling. Students complete projects with area businesses.

     

    Marketing & Entrepreneurship (pre-req of Marketing Principles):

    Advanced Marketing builds on the principles and concepts taught in Marketing Principles. Students assume a managerial perspective in applying economic principles in marketing, analyzing operations needs, examining distribution and financial alternatives, managing marketing information, pricing products and services, developing product/service planning strategies, promoting products and services, purchasing, and professional sales. This course also deals with global marketing in that students analyze marketing strategies employed in the U.S. versus those employed in other countries. Students will also work with local businesses to develop advertising campaigns, assist in marketing research, and logo design, etc.

     

    Introduction to Fashion Marketing
    The Fashion Marketing course is an introductory course that teaches the concepts of entry level business and fashion fundamentals. The student will learn fundamentals of basic fashion and business concepts which includes the study of textile fibers, garment styles and parts, retail merchandise categories, designing and producing apparel, retail business fundamentals, and fashion promotion. Students enrolled in this marketing class will have the opportunity to plan and produce a Prom Fashion Show.

    Advanced Fashion Marketing (prerequisite Introduction to Fashion Marketing)
    Advanced Fashion Marketing builds on the fundamental concepts taught in Intro to Fashion Marketing. Students will further develop skills in visual merchandising, product planning, textiles, advertising, special promotions, & professional sales. Students will create promotional plans for local retailers, produce a fashion catalogue, and facilitate the production of the Prom Fashion Show.

    Intro to Sports and Entertainment Marketing (pre-req of Marketing Principles):

    This course introduces the student to the major segments of the Sports and Entertainment Industry and the social and economic impact it has o n the local, state, national, and global economies. Students will create their own sporting franchise. 

     

    Advanced Sports and Entertainment (pre-req of Marketing Principles and Intro to SEM):

    This course provides students opportunities to develop managerial and analytical skills and deepen their knowledge in sports/entertainment marketing.  Units include: Marketing-Information Management, Selling, Publicity/Public Relations, Sales Promotion, Management of Promotion, Product Mix, Pricing, Positioning, and Marketing Planning. Students will also spend time creating a marketing plan for a sporting/entertainment team at our local school.

    Business Essentials
    The course will help students build a strong knowledge base and develop management skills as they study forms of business ownership, functions of management, budgeting and finance, technology, communications, legislation, leadership and teamwork, marketing and economics.  Mastery of these standards through project based learning and leadership development activities of the Career and technical Student Organizations will help prepare students with a competitive edge for the global marketplace.

    Principles of Accounting I (10 th – 12 th Grade)
    Accounting is an essential aspect of every business organization. As future workers, small business owners, and entrepreneurs, students will understand basic accounting principles. As citizens and future investors, students will be better prepared to make economic decisions. This first year course provides an understanding of the accounting cycle and includes transaction analysis, journalizing, posting, cash control, special journals, and financial statements for proprietorships and partnerships.

    Principles of Accounting II (prerequisite Principles of Accounting I)
    This second year course provides a more in-depth study of the field of accounting. Topics include payroll taxes, stockholder’s equity, depreciation, income taxes, inventory, accruals, and preparation of financial statements for corporations. Automated accounting is also used extensively at this level.

    Entrepreneurial Ventures
    Entrepreneurial Ventures is the third course in the Small Business Development Career Pathway. This course concentrates on the management skills necessary for successful business operation. Students will study management strategies for developing and implementing business plans; structuring the organization, financing the organization; and managing information, operations, marketing and human resources. International business principles are infused in the standards for Entrepreneurial Ventures. An integral component of the Entrepreneurial Ventures course is a school-based or community-based entrepreneurial venture that will engage student in the creation and management of a business and the challenges of being a small business owner. Mastery of these standards through project based learning and leadership development activities of Future Business Leaders of America (FBLA) will help prepare students with a competitive edge for the global marketplace.

    Entrepreneurship: Building a Business (prerequisite Marketing & Entrepreneurship)

    Entrepreneurship: Building a Business, an imperative component of a strong economy, is based on individuals who are creative thinkers and risk takers. Therefore, students in this entrepreneurship course focus on recognizing a business opportunity, starting a business based on the recognized opportunity, and operating and maintaining that business. This course begins by moving students from the typical what is” educational focus to the “what can be” focus. Preparation of a business plan allows students to apply the functional areas of accounting, finance, marketing, and management to the planned business, as well as to the legal and economic environments in which a new venture operates.  This course may be taken as a part of a student’s Marketing Pathway or may serve as a stand alone course for students in other disciplines wishing to explore business ownership.  In order to increase the number of application experiences, students should participate in work based learning activities and the student organization, DECA, An Association of Marketing Students. It is highly advantageous for students to participate in a school–based enterprise where available.
     
    Legal Environment of Business
    Legal Environment of Business concentrates on the legal aspects of business ownership and management. Legal issues will include contracts, sales, consumer law, agency and employment law, personal and real property, risk management, environmental law, and government effects on business. The impact of ethics on business operations will be studied. International business principles are infused in the standards for Legal Environment of Business. Mastery of these standards through project-based learning and leadership development activities of Future Business Leaders of America (FBLA) will help prepare students with a competitive edge for the global marketplace.
     
     
     

    Communications Technology “Broadcast Video I”
    The study of communication systems allows students to reinforce, apply, and transfer their academic knowledge and skills to a variety of interesting and relevant activities, problems, and settings.  In addition to their general academic and technical knowledge and skills, students gain an understanding of career opportunities available in the communication fields. They will also discover what employers require to gain and maintain employment in these career areas. Students will perform ethical and societal impact studies and hands-on activities that use the systems approach in the design and improvement of communication products. In addition, students will study and use digital graphics, audio, video, electronic, and multimedia communication systems as they develop skills in this area of technology. Students will participate in individualized, small group, and whole group activities.

    Electronic Communications Technology “Broadcast Video II” (prerequisite Communications Technology; Broadcast Video)
    Enhances Level One skills by providing more in-depth and specialized experiences in video and film equipment operations; covers switches, cameras, lighting, audio boards and tape machines.

    Digital Media Design & Production “Video III” (prerequisite Electronic Communications Technology; Broadcast Video II)

    Digital Media is becoming a very popular form of technology. Students enrolled this course will participate in an active, hands on curriculum exposing them to the digital worlds of audio, video, and imaging. Work in this course will be done using a variety of instructional strategies, including individual, small group, and whole group work.
     
    Broadcast Applications
     


    Food, Nutrition and Wellness
    Food, Nutrition and Wellness is an essential course in understanding nutritional needs and food choices for optimal health of individuals across the lifespan. Interrelationships with wellness are explored. This course leads to the advanced nutrition pathway and develops a knowledge base and the skills necessary to select amoung alternatives in the marketplace, with an emphasis on nutrient content, the development of chronic diseases, and food safety. 

     Food and Nutrition Through the Lifespan (10th-12thgrades)
     (prerequisite Food, Nutrition and Wellness)
    Food and Nutrition through the Lifespan is an advanced course in food and nutrition that addresses the variation in nutritional needs at specific stages of the human life cycle: lactation, infancy, childhood, adolescence, and adulthood including old age. The most common nutritional concerns, their relationship to food choices and health status and strategies to enhance well-being at each stage of the life cycle are emphasized. This course provides knowledge for real life and offers students a pathway into dietetics, consumer foods, and nutrition science careers with additional education at the post-secondary level.

    Food Science
    Food science integrates many branches of science and relies on the application of the rapid advances in technology to expand and improve the food supply. Students will evaluate the effects of processing, preparation, and storage on the quality, safety, wholesomeness, and nutritive value of foods. Building on information learned in Nutrition and Wellness and Chemistry, this course illustrates scientific principles in an applied context, exposing students to the wonders of the scientific world.

    Introduction to Culinary
    Introduction to Culinary Arts is a course designed to introduce students to fundamental food preparation terms, concepts, and methods in culinary arts where laboratory practice will parallel class work. Fundamental techniques, skills, and terminology are covered and mastered with an emphasis on basic kitchen and dining room safety, sanitation, equipment maintenance and operation procedures. The course also provides an overview of the professionalism in the culinary industry and career opportunities leading into a career pathway to Culinary Arts.


     

    Introduction to Engineering Drawing and Design

    Introduction to Engineering Drawing and Design is a foundation course for 9th and 10th graders; and serves as an introduction to the Engineering pathway. Emphasis is placed on the technical drafting skills set of engineering. This class can be taken as an elective or as part of the Engineering pathway. Students will gain experience in the following areas of concentration:

     

    A.) Technical Freehand Sketches                             F.) Universal System Model

    B.) Mechanical Drafting  w\ T-square                     G.) History of Engineering

    C.)  3D Computer-Aided Drafting                             H.) Product Design

    D.) Creating & Reading Blue Prints                           I.) Reverse Engineering

    E.) Engineering Design Process                                 J.) Prototyping

    Engineering Concepts (prerequisite Foundations of Engineering and Technology)Engineering Concepts is the second course in the engineering pathway. This course introduces students to the fundamental principles of engineering. Students learn about areas of specialization within engineering and engineering design, and apply engineering tools and procedures as they complete hands-on instructional activities.

    Engineering Applications/Research (prerequisite Foundations of Engineering and Technology)

    Engineering Applications is the third course in the engineering pathway. Students have opportunities to apply engineering design as they develop a solution for a technological problem. Students use applications of mathematics and science to predict the success of an engineered solution and complete hands-on activities with tools, materials, and processes as they develop working drawings and prototypes.
     
    Foundations of Manufacturing & Materials Science
    Foundations of Manufacturing and Materials Science is the introductory course for the Manufacturing pathway; however this course can be taken as a general elective. This class is for those students who like to design and build things out of wood, plastic, and or metal.  Students will become familiar with related careers and develop fundamental technological literacy as they learn about the history, systems, and processes of manufacturing. In addition, the course will provide an overview of the safe use of tools and equipment used in the industry.
     
    Robotics and Automotive Systems

    Upon completing this course, students will be able to apply their knowledge of computer aided design (CAD), computer numerical control (CNC), robotics, computer assisted manufacturing (CAM), programmable logic controllers, automated guided vehicles (AGV), and computer integrated manufacturing (CIM). Students must be willing to commit to attending weekend robotic competitions throughout the year.


    Healthcare Courses:

    Healthcare Intro

    In this course, students explore traditional and new healthcare career opportunities that are emerging and changing constantly. Students also study history of medicine; current events in medicine; cultural diversity in healthcare; legal and ethical responsibilities for healthcare workers; medical terminology; some anatomy, physiology, and pathophysiology; basic infection control; human growth and development; perform AHA (American Heart Association) Adult CPR with AED training; measure weights and heights; review basic math skills needed in medicine; and develop many more cognitive and/or motor skills. Students begin a healthcare portfolio to identify what skills and knowledge that they are learning. Students are also strongly encouraged to develop leadership skills through participation in our career technical student organization, HOSA (Health Occupations Students of America). Monthly meetings, blood drives, and state and national conferences are all available to students who join HOSA.

     

    Introduction to Biotechnology

    This course is the second course in the career pathway that introduces student to the fundamentals of biotechnology. Included in this course is a basic overview of current trends and careers in biotechnology. Additionally, emphasis on basic laboratory skills along with the business, regulatory, and ethical aspects of biotechnology is included. Students will demonstrate knowledge in fundamentals of math and statistics concepts, genetics, organic chemistry, biochemistry, cell biology, microbiology and molecular biology.


    Applications of Biotechnology

    Students will demonstrate proficiency in advanced technology techniques that demonstrate low biotechnology has contributed to the advancement of biology impacting human well being to include: forensics, cell biology, cancer treatment, epidemiology of infectious disease, nanotechnology, bioinformatics, genomics, stem cell biology, transgenics, and gene therapy.

     

    Diagnostic Services
    In this course, students explore traditional and new healthcare career opportunities that are emerging and changing constantly. Students also study history of medicine; current events in medicine; cultural diversity in healthcare; legal and ethical responsibilities for healthcare workers; medical terminology; some anatomy, physiology, and pathophysiology; basic infection control; human growth and development; perform AHA (American Heart Association) Adult CPR with AED training; measure weights and heights; review basic math skills needed in medicine; and develop many more cognitive and/or motor skills. Students begin a healthcare portfolio to identify what skills and knowledge that they are learning. Students are also strongly encouraged to develop leadership skills through participation in our career technical student organization, HOSA (Health Occupations Students of America). Monthly meetings, blood drives, and state and national conferences are all available to students who join HOSA.


    AP Computer Science A

    This course is in the Advanced Placement (AP) Program developed by the College Board. The course content follows the curriculum necessary for successful performance on the Advanced Placement Examination given by the College Board. Topics included in this course include computer systems, features of programming languages, programming methodology, fundamental data structures, and algorithms. Programs are written in various application areas, such as math, business, science, and entertainment. As different colleges have different criteria for placement and for computer science credit, we suggest that the student make inquiries at their colleges of interest to determine the score necessary for credit and for placement.

Last Modified on June 13, 2017