• Longhorns

    Science Courses

     


     

    Advanced Placement Biology
    This course conforms to the College Board topics for the Advanced Placement Biology Examination. The major themes of the course as indicated by the AP Biology course guide include molecules and cells, heredity and evolution, and organisms and populations. Students are expected to take the AP Biology exam in May. This course requires a rigorous college level lab component and utilizes a college text.

    Advanced Placement Chemistry 
    This course conforms to the College Board topics for the Advanced Placement Chemistry Examination.  The major themes for this course as indicated by the AP Chemistry course guide include the structure of matter, the states of matter, reactions, descriptive chemistry, and college level chemistry laboratories.  Students are expected to take the AP Chemistry exam in May. This course requires a rigorous college level lab component and utilizes a college text.

    Advanced Placement Environmental Science 
    This course conforms to College Board topics for the Advanced Placement Environmental Science Examination. The major themes for this course as indicated by the AP Environmental Science course guide include Earth systems and resources, the living world, populations, land and water use, energy resources and consumption, pollution, and global change. Students are expected to take the AP exam in May. This course requires a rigorous college level lab component and utilizes a college text.

    Advanced Placement Physics 1 
    Algebra-based is the equivalent of the first semester of introductory, algebra-based college physics course.  AP Physics 1 explores topics such as Newtonian mechanics (including rotational motion); work, energy, and power; mechanical waves and sound; and introductory, simple circuits. Through inquiry-based learning, students will develop scientific critical thinking and reasoning skills. The course is based on six Big Ideas, which encompass core scientific principles, theories, and processes that cut across traditional boundaries and provide a broad way of thinking about the physical world.  Students establish lines of evidence and use them to develop and refine testable explanations and predictions of natural phenomena. Students are expected to take the AP exam in May. This course requires a rigorous college level lab component and utilizes a college text.

    Advanced Placement Physics 2

    Algebra-based is the equivalent of the second semester of, introductory college-level physics course. Students cultivate their understanding of Physics through inquiry-based investigations as they explore topics such as fluid statics and dynamics; thermodynamics with kinetic theory; PV diagrams and probability; electrostatics; electrical circuits with capacitors; magnetic fields; electromagnetism; physical and geometric optics; and quantum, atomic, and nuclear physics. Students establish lines of evidence and use them to develop and refine testable explanations and predictions of natural phenomena. Students are expected to take the AP exam in May. This course requires a rigorous college level lab component and utilizes a college text.

    Advanced Placement Physics C Mechanics
    Mechanics corresponds to approximately one semester of calculus based college physics. Mechanics focuses on six content areas: kinematics; Newton’s Laws; work, energy and power; systems of particles and linear momentum; circular motion and rotation; and oscillations and gravitation. This course is appropriate for students planning to specialize in physical science or in engineering. The aim of this course is to increase student ability to read, understand and interpret physical information. Inquiry based laboratory activities are designed to allow students to develop models to be used in the analysis of physical situations. Student will be expected to use the mathematical models developed in order to reason through and solve problems or analyze physical situations.

    Advanced Placement Physics C Electricity and Magnetism
    Electricity and Magnetism corresponds to approximately one semester of calculus based college physics. Electricity and Magnetism focuses on five content areas: electrostatics; conductors, capacitors and dielectrics; electric circuits; magnetic fields; and electromagnetism. This course is the second in the sequence of AP Physics C courses and appropriate for students planning to specialize in physical science or in engineering. The aim of this course is to increase student ability to read, understand and interpret physical information. Inquiry based laboratory activities are designed to allow students to develop models to be used in the analysis of physical situations. Student will be expected to use the mathematical models developed in order to reason through and solve problems or analyze physical situations. Due to the nature of the level of calculus needed to successfully understand the mathematical models, students should have completed a year of AP Calculus before enrolling. 

    Advanced Placement Research
    AP Research, the second course in the AP Capstone experience, allows students to deeply explore an academic topic, problem, issue, or idea of individual interest. Students design, plan, and conduct a year-long investigation to address a unique research question. Through this inquiry, they further the skills they acquired in the AP Seminar course by learning research methodology; employing ethical research practices; and accessing, analyzing, and sythesizing information and data.

    Biology 
    The Biology curriculum is designed to continue student investigations of the life sciences that began in grades K-8 and provide students the necessary skills to be proficient in biology. This curriculum includes more abstract concepts such as the interdependence of organisms, the relationship of matter, energy, and organization in living systems, the behavior of organisms, and biological evolution. Students investigate biological concepts through experience in laboratories and field work using the processes of inquiry.  A state mandated End of Course Test (EOC) is required and counts 20% of the student's overall course grade.

    Biology Honors   
    The Biology curriculum is designed to continue student investigations of the life sciences that began in grades K-8 and provide students the necessary skills to be proficient in biology. This curriculum includes more abstract concepts such as the interdependence of organisms, the relationship of matter, energy, and organization in living systems, the behavior of organisms, and biological evolution. Students investigate biological concepts through experience in laboratories and field work using the processes of inquiry. Other topics and instructional methods specific to preparing students for the rigors of future honors science courses and Advanced Placement courses are also included.  A state mandated End of Course Test (EOC) is required and counts 20% of the student's overall course grade.

    Biotechnology
    Biotechnology introduces students to the broad understanding of the fundamentals of biotechnology and the impact on society. The knowledge and skills in this course provides a basic overview of current trends and careers in biotechnology, with an emphasis on basic laboratory skills, along with the business, regulatory, and ethical aspects of biotechnology. The skills learned in Biotechnology are useful for students wanting to pursue careers in Chemistry, Biology, Biomedical Engineering, and the Healthcare fields. The prerequisite for the pathway is Introduction to Healthcare Science Technology.  

    Chemistry
    The Chemistry curriculum is designed to continue student investigations of the physical sciences that began in grades K-8 and provides students the necessary skills to be proficient in chemistry. This curriculum includes more abstract concepts such as the structure of atoms, structure and properties of matter, and the conservation and interaction of energy and matter. Students investigate chemistry concepts through experience in laboratories and field work using the processes of inquiry.

    Chemistry Honors 
    The Chemistry curriculum is designed to continue student investigations of the physical sciences that began in grades K-8 and provide students the necessary skills to be proficient in chemistry. This curriculum includes more abstract concepts such as the structure of atoms, structure and properties of matter, and the conservation and interaction of energy and matter. Students investigate chemistry concepts through experience in laboratories and field work using the processes of inquiry. Other topics specific to preparing students for the rigors of an Advanced Placement course will be integrated throughout the course. The rigor and instructional techniques will model the Advanced Placement course requirements as much as possible.

    Earth Systems
    Earth Systems Science is designed to continue student investigations that began in K-8 Earth Science and Life Science curricula and investigate the connections among Earth’s systems through Earth history.  These systems – the atmosphere, hydrosphere, geosphere, and biosphere – interact through time to produce the Earth’s landscapes, ecology, and resources. This course develops the explanations of phenomena fundamental to the sciences of geology and physical geography, including the early history of the Earth, plate tectonics, landform evolution, the Earth’s geologic record, weather and climate, and the history of life on Earth.

    Environmental Science 
    The Environmental Science curriculum is designed to extend student investigations that began in grades K-8. It integrates the study of many components of our environment, including the human impact on our planet. The concepts integrated into this course include: flow of energy & cycling of matter, interconnection of all life, stability and change in an ecosystem, conservation and resource allocation, and evaluation of human activity and technology.

    Forensics 
    The Forensics curriculum is designed to continue student investigations in both the physical sciences and life sciences that began in grades K-8.  Students will expand and apply that knowledge to the field of investigating and solving criminal and civil suits. Topics included are based on the current Georgia Performance Standards and include topics such as: trace evidence analysis, fingerprinting, body decomposition, DNA, blood analysis, toxicology and other topics. This curriculum explores numerous career fields in forensics through hands-on experience in laboratories and field work using the processes of inquiry.

    Human Anatomy/Physiology (Biology II)
    The human anatomy and physiology curriculum is designed to continue student investigations that began in grades K-8 and high school biology. Areas of study include organization of the body; protection, support and movement; providing internal coordination and regulation; processing and transporting; and reproduction, growth and development. The course integrates careers related to medicine, research, health-care and modern medical technology and utilizes case studies concerning diseases, disorders and ailments.

    Physical Science 
    This course is designed as a survey course of chemistry and physics. This curriculum includes the more abstract concepts such as the conceptualization of the structure of atoms, motion and forces, and the conservation of energy and matter, the action/reaction principle, and wave behavior. Students investigate physical science concepts through experience in laboratories and field work using the processes of inquiry.  A state mandated End of Course Test (EOC) is required and counts 20% of the student's overall course grade. 

    Physics 
    The Physics curriculum is designed to continue student investigations of the physical sciences that began in grades K-8 and provide students the necessary skills to be proficient in physics. This curriculum includes more abstract concepts such as interactions of matter and energy, velocity, acceleration, force, energy, momentum, and charge. Students investigate physics concepts through experience in laboratories and field work using the processes of inquiry. 

     
Last Modified on July 31, 2018