• LonghornsSocial Studies Courses

    World History
    This yearlong, one credit required course serves as a comprehensive, intensive study of major events and themes in world history. The course examines the political, cultural, economics and social development and growth of civilizations. The course curriculum covers the growth and development of ancient civilizations, the emergence of nations through trade/communications, intellectual development, scientific/technological development, emergence of nation-states, nations in conflict, the merging interdependence of nations in the 20th century, and the study of change, continuity, and globalization at the beginning of the 21 st century.

    World History Honors
    This yearlong, one credit course serves as a comprehensive, intensive study of major events and themes in world history. The course examines the political, cultural, economics and social development and growth of civilizations. The course curriculum covers the growth and development of ancient civilizations, the emergence of nations through trade/communications, intellectual development, scientific/technological development, emergence of nation-states, nations in conflict, the merging interdependence of nations in the 20th century, and the study of change, continuity, and globalization at the beginning of the 21 st century. Special attention is given to developing the critical thinking, test taking, and writing skills needed to succeed in future Advanced Placement classes. Additional outside reading and document analysis are also incorporated into this course as part of the accelerated curriculum.

    Advanced Placement World History
    This yearlong, one credit course conforms to the College Board topics for the Advanced Placement World History examination. It serves as a comprehensive, intensive study of major events & themes in world history. The course examines the political, cultural, economics and social development and growth of civilizations. The course curriculum covers the growth and development of ancient civilizations, the emergence of nations through trade/communications, intellectual development, scientific/technological development, emergence of nation-states, nations in conflict, the merging interdependence of nations in the 20th century, and the study of change, continuity, and globalization at the beginning of the 21 st century.
     
    The course curriculum is designed around the following themes: the dynamics of change & continuity across time; patterns and effects of interaction among societies and regions (trade, war, diplomacy and international organizations); the effects of technology, economics, and demography on people and the environment; systems of social structure and gender structure; cultural, intellectual, and religious developments; and changes in the function, structures and attitudes towards states & political identities. Students will develop a greater understanding of global relationships in varied human societies. This process combines selective factual knowledge and analytical skills. It requires thinking on an advanced level and great verbal and written skills. Students are strongly encouraged to take the College Board AP World History examination upon completion of this course in May. Significant outside reading and assignments should be anticipated as part of the course.

    United States History
    This yearlong, one credit required course serves as a comprehensive, intensive study of major events and themes in United States History. The course curriculum includes a survey of the history of our country beginning with the Age of Exploration and ending with the early 21 st century. Topics covered include colonial America, the American Revolution, the Critical Period, the Federalist Era, the Jeffersonian Era, the Age of Jackson, 19th Century Reform Movements, Sectionalism & the Civil War, Reconstruction, the Industrial Revolution, the Gilded Age, the Progressive Era, World War I, the Great Depression, World War II, the Cold War, the Civil Rights Movement, the Vietnam War, and recent events from the 1980s through the beginnings of the 21st century. A state mandated End of Course Test is required and counts 20% of the student’s overall course grade.

    Advanced Placement United States History
    This yearlong, one credit course conforms to the College Board topics for the Advanced Placement United States History examination. This college level curriculum covers the topics of pre-Colombian societies, European discovery and settlement, colonial America, the American Revolution, the Constitution and the New Republic, the Age of Jefferson, nationalism, sectionalism, territorial expansion, the Civil War, Reconstruction, Industrialization, the progressive Era, World War I, the Great Depression & the New Deal, World War II, the Cold War, the Civil Rights Movement, the Vietnam War, and recent events from the 1980's through the beginnings of the 21st Century. The course is organized around the themes of American diversity, American identity, culture, demographic change, economics transformations, environment, globalization, politics and citizenship, reform, religion, slavery and its legacy, and war & diplomacy. A state mandated End of Course Test is required and counts 20% of the student’s overall course grade. Students are strongly encouraged to take the College Board AP U.S. History examination at the completion of this course in May. Significant outside reading and assignments should be anticipated as a part of the course.

    American Government
    This one semester, ½ credit required course provides a background in the philosophy, functions, and structure of the United States government. The course curriculum focuses on the philosophical foundations of the United States government, basic concepts and principles of the American system of government, the relationship of the national government to state governments and citizens, the roles and responsibilities of citizenship, participation in the political process, and the relationship of the individual to the law and legal system. This course stresses critical analysis of public issues while integrating and reinforcing social studies skills.
     
    Advanced Placement Government & Politics: United States—AP American Government
    This yearlong, one credit course conforms to the College Board topics for the Advanced Placement Government and Politics: United States examination. This college level curriculum covers the concepts of federalism, separation of powers, influences on the formulation and adoption of the Constitution, political parties and elections, interest groups, institutions and policy processes, civil liberties, and civil rights. Students are strongly encouraged to take the College Board AP American Government examination at the completion of this course in May. Significant outside reading and assignments should be anticipated as a part of the course.

    Economics/Business — 1 semester course / ½ credit
    This one semester, ½ credit required course provides a basic foundation in the field of economics by focusing on the American economic system. The course curriculum covers fundamental economic concepts, comparative economic systems, microeconomics, international economic interdependence, and personal finance. Emphasis is placed upon the student’s ability to analyze economic information critically and to make decisions concerning public issues. A state mandated End of Course Test is required and counts 20% of the student’s overall course grade.
     
    Advanced Placement Macroeconomics
    Conforms to College Board topics for the Advanced Placement Macroeconomics Examination. Covers basic economic concepts, measurement of economic performance, national income and price determination and international economics and growth. A state mandated End of Course Test is required and counts 20% of the student's overall course grade.
     
    Advanced Placement European History
    This yearlong, one credit elective course conforms to the College Board topics for the AdvancedPlacement European History examination. Students will acquire a knowledge of the events and movements that occurred in Europe during the time period from 1450 AD to the present. These events and movements are explored through three themes: intellectual and cultural history, political and diplomatic history, and social and economic history. In addition, students learn the skills of document analysis, historiography, and analytical essay composition. Students are strongly encouraged to take the College Board AP European History examination at the completion of this course in May. Significant outside reading and assignments should be anticipated as a part of the course.
     
    Psychology - 11th 12th Grades - 1 semester course/ ½ credit
    This one semester, ½ credit elective course investigates the relationship of psychology to other sciences, the principles of psychology, contributions of major psychologists, the scientific method, uniqueness, experimental ethics, developmental psychology, heredity and environmental aspects of psychology, learning theory, memory and thinking types, biological bases of behavior, personality, intelligence, social disorders, awareness, emotion, motivation, conflict resolution, and research methods used in the study of psychology.

    Sociology – 11th 12th Grades — 1 semester course / ½ credit
    This one semester, ½ credit elective course serves as an introduction to the field of sociology. After an introduction to classic sociologists and theory, students will study the following topics: society and its five basic social institutions, cultural and structural influences on human belief and behavior, research and methods of sociology, population demographics, culture and its elements, the roles of subcultures in society, socialization, the social order and deviation, inequality in societies, race relations and civil rights, group conflicts in society, geriatrics, criminal behavior, poverty, domestic violence, public health issues, pluralistic vs. homogeneous societies, ethnocentrism, and the impact of urbanization industrialization on society.

    Advanced Placement Psychology
    This yearlong, one credit elective course conforms to the College Board topics for the Advanced Placement Psychology examination. This course is designed to introduce students to the systematic and scientific study of the behavior and mental processes of human beings and other animals. Students will be exposed to the psychological facts, principles, and phenomena associated with each of the major subfields within psychology. Course topics include: Psychological History and Approaches, Research Methods, Biological Bases of Behavior, Sensation and Perception, States of Consciousness, Learning, Cognition, Motivation and Emotion, Developmental Psychology, Testing and Individual Differences, Abnormal Psychology, Treatment of Psychological Disorders, and Social Psychology. Students are strongly encouraged to take the College Board AP Comparative Government and Politics examination at the completion of this course in May. Significant outside reading and assignments should be anticipated as a part of the course.
     
    World Geography
    This yearlong, one credit elective course serves as an introduction to both physical and cultural geography. After an introduction to geographic themes & concepts, students study each major regions of the world, focusing on the importance of physical geography and its impact on the region’s historical, cultural, economic, and political development. For each region, students learn about the importance of the physical geography and Study includes topics such as population, energy sources, urbanization, technology, environment and food supply.
     
    World Geography — 1 semester course / ½ credit
    This one semester, ½ credit elective course, paired with Driver’s Education or another ½ credit elective course, serves as an introduction to both physical and cultural geography. After an introduction to geographic themes and concepts, students study each major regions of the world, focusing on the importance of physical geography and its impact on the region’s historical, cultural, economic, and political development. For each region, students learn about the importance of the physical geography and Study includes topics such as population, energy sources, urbanization, technology, environment and food supply.
     
    Advanced Placement Human Geography
    This yearlong, one credit elective course conforms to the College Board topics for the Advanced Placement Human Geography examination. It introduces students to the patterns and processes that have shaped human understanding, use, and alteration of Earth’s surface. Topics covered include Population, Cultural Processes, Cities and Urban Land Use, Industrialization and Economic Development, Agriculture and Rural Land Use and the Political Use of Space. The course curriculum is organized around the themes that will allow students to: use and think about maps and spatial data, understand and interpret the implications of associations among phenomena in places, recognize and interpret at different scales the relationships among patterns and processes; define regions and evaluate the regionalization process, and characterize and analyze changing interconnections among places. Students are strongly encouraged to take the College Board AP Human Geography exam upon the completion of this course in May. Significant outside reading and assignments should be anticipated as part of the course.
     
    Humanities (Theory of Knowledge)
    Investigates philosophical ideas and values in human affairs with history and philosophy as the basis. Provides an interdisciplinary approach that embraces literature, language, composition, music and art, science and mathematics. Provides the curriculum connections that encourage analytical, comparative and critical thinking skills development.
     
    Current Issues
    This one semester, ½ credit elective course addresses the major socioeconomic and political events of the Post World War II era. Students will study the following: current social, economic and political issues; sources of information, the interaction of technology & society, the relationship between the environment & energy, criminal behavior, health and social welfare programs, education, immigration, human rights, issues surrounding the development and use of weapons of mass destruction, ideological and political conflict, world economic issues and international trade. A good historical understanding of these topics and well developed communication skills (both oral & written) are strongly recommended for this course.
     
    US History Through Film 

    This course is designed as an introductory course for ninth graders. The purpose is to introduce students to selected people, places, and events that they will study in depth in the required United States History course which will be taken in their 11th grade year. Students will participate in a variety of document based introductory and enrichment activities including text-based, charts and graphs, and visual sources that will help provide a foundation for DBQ (document based questions) exercises for high school and aid students for post-secondary education. 

     
     
     
Last Modified on September 2, 2016