• ctae
    CTAE Course Descriptions
     
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    Companion Animal Systems Pathway (D): Companion animals are a large part of the animal care industry. There are many services and career opportunities in this career pathway area. Veterinarians care for the health of animals and work to improve public health. They diagnose, treat, and research medical conditions and diseases of pets, livestock, and other animals.
     
    • Course 1: Basic Agricultural Science This course is designed as the foundational course for all Agriculture, Food & Natural Resources Pathways. The course introduces the major areas of scientific agricultural production and research; presents problem solving lessons and introductory skills and knowledge in agricultural science and agri-related technologies. Classroom and laboratory activities are supplemented through supervised agricultural experiences and leadership programs and activities. This course is the prerequisite for all AFNR pathways and is intended for students in grades 8-10.  Prerequisite: None
    • Course 2: Animal Science and Biotechnology This course is designed to introduce students to the scientific principles that underlie the breeding and husbandry of agricultural animals, and the production, processing, and distribution of agricultural animal products. This course introduces scientific principles applied to the animal industry; covers reproduction, production technology, processing, and distribution of agricultural animal products. Prerequisite: Basic Agricultural Science
    • Course 3: Small Animal Care The goal of this course is designed to provide students with skills and concepts involved with the care and management of companion animals. Classroom and laboratory activities are supplemented through supervised agricultural experiences and leadership programs and activities.  Prerequisite: Animal Science and Biotechnology
    • Internship Forsyth (Work-Based Learning) Agriculture Work-Based Learning placements represent the pinnacle of the Career-Related Education experience. To qualify for a WBL placement, a student must be at least 16 years old. Students must also have a defined Career Pathway in order to participate in a Work-Based Learning placement. This is especially important for successful completion of a student’s pathway in that their job placement is directly related to the curriculum of the pathway classes they have completed or in which they are concurrently enrolled. 
    Environmental Agriculture Systems (N): Enviromental engineers research, design, plan, or perform engineering duties in the prevention, control, and remediation of environmental hazards using various engineering disciplines. Work may include agricultural waste treatment, site remediation, or pollution control technology. Environmental engineers use the principles of engineering, soil science, biology, and chemistry to develop solutions to environmental problems. They are involved in efforts to improve recycling, waste disposal, public health, and water and air pollution control. 
     
    • Course 1: Basic Agricultural Science This course is designed as the foundational course for all Agriculture, Food & Natural Resources Pathways. The course introduces the major areas of scientific agricultural production and research; presents problem solving lessons and introductory skills and knowledge in agricultural science and agri-related technologies. Classroom and laboratory activities are supplemented through supervised agricultural experiences and leadership programs and activities. This course is the prerequisite for all AFNR pathways and is intended for students in grades 8-10.  Prerequisite: None
    • Course 2: Environmental Science and Stewardship The course delves into the environment, natural resources, ecosystems, soils, land use, chemicals in the environment, and water and air quality. After completing the course, the student should be aware of issues in our society relating to environmental concerns as well as land use and waste management. Classroom and laboratory activities are supplemented through supervised agricultural experiences and leadership programs and activities. Prerequisite: Basic Agricultural Science
    • Course 3: Sustainable Agriculture This course is designed to introduce students to the concepts of sustainability related to agriculture production. Students will learn how to implement production and marketing practices that are profitable and environmentally sound while meeting the needs of both the present and future generations. Prerequisite: Environmental Science and Stewardship
    • Internship Forsyth (Work-Based Learning) Agriculture Work-Based Learning placements represent the pinnacle of the Career-Related Education experience. To qualify for a WBL placement, a student must be at least 16 years old. Students must also have a defined Career Pathway in order to participate in a Work-Based Learning placement. This is especially important for successful completion of a student’s pathway in that their job placement is directly related to the curriculum of the pathway classes they have completed or in which they are concurrently enrolled.
    Landscape Management Pathway (S): A career in landscape management offers a variety of job opportunities in the fields of education, research, golf and sports turf, landscape design, parks and gardens, public service, production management, and sales and marketing. Some jobs available include landscape designer, greenhouse manager, golf course superintendent, plant breeder, florist, agricultural chemical researcher and garden center owner. Educational requirements in this field vary by job. Two‐  and four‐year programs are available in this area. Advanced degrees may be necessary for some research‐ related jobs. Those who are interested in this field should be able to carry out projects and work independently, have a commitment to quality and customer service, and have an appreciation of our natural environment and have good interpersonal skills.
     
    • Course 1: Basic Agricultural Science This course is designed as the foundational course for all Agriculture, Food & Natural Resources Pathways. The course introduces the major areas of scientific agricultural production and research; presents problem solving lessons and introductory skills and knowledge in agricultural science and agri-related technologies. Classroom and laboratory activities are supplemented through supervised agricultural experiences and leadership programs and activities. This course is the prerequisite for all AFNR pathways and is intended for students in grades 8-10.  Prerequisite: None
    • Course 2: General Horticulture and Plant Science This course is designed as an introduction for the Horticulture-Plant Science Pathway Program of Study. The course introduces the major concepts of plant and horticulture science. Classroom and laboratory activities are supplemented through supervised agricultural experiences and leadership programs and activities. Prerequisite: Basic Agricultural Science
    • Course 3: Turf Production and Management This course introduces procedures to establish, manage, and maintain ornamental or recreational turf, to prepare and maintain athletic fields and playing surfaces, and to produce and market turf. Classroom and laboratory activities are supplemented through supervised agricultural experiences and leadership programs and activities.  Prerequisite: General Horticulture and Plant Science
    • Internship Forsyth (Work-Based Learning) Agriculture Work-Based Learning placements represent the pinnacle of the Career-Related Education experience. To qualify for a WBL placement, a student must be at least 16 years old. Students must also have a defined Career Pathway in order to participate in a Work-Based Learning placement. This is especially important for successful completion of a student’s pathway in that their job placement is directly related to the curriculum of the pathway classes they have completed or in which they are concurrently enrolled. 
    Veterinary Science Pathway (C, D): The Veterinary Science pathway is one of many pathways in the Agriculture, Food, and Natural Resources Career Cluster. Career opportunities in this pathway may include: Animal Scientists, Veterinarians, Veterinarian Technologists and Technicians, Veterinary Assistants, Laboratory Animal Caretakers, Zoologists and Wildlife Biologists, Animal Control Workers, and Farm and Ranch Managers just to name a few. Upon completion of the Veterinary Science pathway courses the student will be able to give a basic understanding of treating health problems of pets, livestock, and animals in zoos, racetracks, and laboratories, as well as leadership skills necessary for the industry.
     
    • Course 1: Basic Agricultural Science This course is designed as the foundational course for all Agriculture, Food & Natural Resources Pathways. The course introduces the major areas of scientific agricultural production and research; presents problem solving lessons and introductory skills and knowledge in agricultural science and agri-related technologies. Classroom and laboratory activities are supplemented through supervised agricultural experiences and leadership programs and activities. This course is the prerequisite for all AFNR pathways and is intended for students in grades 8-10.  Prerequisite: None
    • Course 2: Animal Science and Biotechnology This course is designed to introduce students to the scientific principles that underlie the breeding and husbandry of agricultural animals, and the production, processing, and distribution of agricultural animal products. This course introduces scientific principles applied to the animal industry; covers reproduction, production technology, processing, and distribution of agricultural animal products. Prerequisite: Basic Agricultural Science
    • Course 3: Veterinary Science The agricultural education course in veterinary science covers the basics of animal care. Topics covered include disease, parasites, feeding, shelter, grooming, and general animal care. The target population is career preparatory students desiring to continue education after high school or to enter the workforce after graduation from high school. College preparatory students benefit from the course as an elective if they plan to enter college and purse a degree to enter the veterinary profession. This course allows students entering the workforce after graduation from high school to develop entry-level skills to become employed and to continue education on the job. Prerequisite: Animal Science and Biotechnology
    • Internship Forsyth (Work-Based Learning) Agriculture Work-Based Learning placements represent the pinnacle of the Career-Related Education experience. To qualify for a WBL placement, a student must be at least 16 years old. Students must also have a defined Career Pathway in order to participate in a Work-Based Learning placement. This is especially important for successful completion of a student’s pathway in that their job placement is directly related to the curriculum of the pathway classes they have completed or in which they are concurrently enrolled. 

      av

    Audio-Video Technology and Film Pathway (C, L, N, S, W): Students will design, manufacture, operate and/or repair audiovisual equipment; create presentations of sound, video, and data in a variety of formats; gather information, prepare broadcasts, build sets, and operate equipment used to record and transmit programs and/or motion pictures; and operate sound mixing and/or video editing equipment.

    Student Plan of Study Guide: https://www.gadoe.org/Curriculum-Instruction-and-Assessment/CTAE/Documents/POS-AAVTC-Audio-Video-Tech-Film.pdf

    • Course 1: Audio & Video Technology & Film 
      This course will serve as the foundational course in the Audio & Video Technology & Film 
      pathway. The course prepares students for employment or entry into a postsecondary 
      education program in the audio and video technology career field. Topics covered may 
      include, but are not limited to: terminology, safety, basic equipment, script writing, 
      production teams, production and programming, lighting, recording and editing, studio 
      production, and professional ethics. Skills USA, the Georgia Scholastic Press Association, 
      Technology Student Association (TSA) and Student Television Network are examples of, 
      but not limited to, appropriate organizations for providing leadership training and/or for 
      reinforcing specific career and technical skills and may be considered an integral part of the 
      instructional program. All material covered in Audio & Video Technology & Film I will be 
      utilized in subsequent courses. The pre-requisite for this course is advisor approval. Prerequisite: None
    • Course 2: Audio & Video Technology & Film II This one credit course is the second in a series of three that prepares students for a career in Audio Video Technology and Film production and/or to transfer to a postsecondary program for further study. Topics include Planning, Writing, Directing and Editing a Production; Field Equipment Functions; Operational Set-Up and Maintenance; Advanced Editing Operations; Studio Productions; Performance; Audio/Video Control Systems; Production Graphics; Career Opportunities; and Professional Ethics. Skills USA, the Georgia Scholastic Press Association, Technology Student Association (TSA) and Student Television Network are examples of, but not limited to, appropriate organizations for providing leadership training and/or for reinforcing specific career and technical skills and may be considered an integral part of the instructional program. Prerequisite: Audio & Video Technology & Film
    • Course 3: Audio & Video Technology & Film III This one-credit transition course is designed to facilitate student-led projects under the guidance of the instructor. Students work cooperatively and independently in all phases of production. Skills USA, the Georgia Scholastic Press Association, Technology Student Association (TSA), and Student Television Network are examples of, but not limited to, appropriate organizations for providing leadership training and/or for reinforcing specific career and technical skills and may be considered an integral part of the instructional program. Prerequisite: Audio & Video Technology & Film II
    • Internship Forsyth (Work-Based Learning) Arts, A/V Technology, and Communications Work-Based Learning placements represent the pinnacle of the Career-Related Education experience. To qualify for a WBL placement, a student must be at least 16 years old. Students must also have a defined Career Pathway in order to participate in a Work-Based Learning placement. This is especially important for successful completion of a student’s pathway in that their job placement is directly related to the curriculum of the pathway classes they have completed or in which they are concurrently enrolled.
    Animation and Digital Media Pathway (N): Students will apply components for 2-D and 3-D animation elements ranging from storyboarding to mastering industry software tools; as well as, the physics and anatomy of motion, the technology of animation, and the uses of cameras and lighting.
     
    • Course 1: Introduction to Digital Media Students in the Introduction of Digital Media course will learn the basic components of 2-D and 3D animation development from storyboarding elements to fundamental software capabilities. The course serves as an introduction to the animation history, keyboarding shortcuts, project filing, and career awareness. Instruction in this course focuses on storyboard creation, the physics and anatomy of motion, technology of animation, properties and use of color, cameras and lighting, fundamentals of modeling and animating, creating a portfolio and file management. This course provides a structure for digital literacy as well as development of technical knowledge and intellectual skills for analytical thinking; in addition, students will work productively and responsibly in individual and collaborative settings. This introductory pathway course of three sequenced courses will give students the opportunity to earn an industry credential in animation. No prerequisite for this course. Prerequisite: None
    • Course 2: Principles and Concepts of Animation In Principles and Concepts of Animation, students will continue to develop and implement aesthetics of color selection, storyboarding in 2-D digital animation, and develop animatic creations from 2-D to 3-D. Students in this course will learn interface tools, the use of drawing tools, animating the camera, importing images from web sources and files, working with sound and lip syncing, understanding paths and motion design, and frame by frame animation creation relative to sequence planning and pacing. This course will allow students to explore more advanced aspects of character animation including subtle character gesture and advanced action timing with emphasis on personal observation. The course will allow students to develop an understanding of basic sound considerations such as lip syncing, voice-overs, and the synchronization of sound with the visual product. This course will allow students to build on previously learned storyboarding skills, develop scripts, determine character motivations, consider setting and motion variables, and learn other unique traits of animation through integrated activities. Prerequisite: Introduction to Digital Media
    • Course 3: Advanced Animation, Game and APP Design In this course students will continue working in 2-D and 3-D environments by importing 3- D models while working in 3-D space morphing, and inverse kinematics. While learning the basics of Game and APP design, the students will acquire knowledge of human and animal animations, apply the aesthetic and technical aspects of animation of characters, and analyze the physics and physicalization of action, weight, and timing. The course advances students’ knowledge of sound integration into animated products; by focusing on skills that include lip-syncing, voice overs, and synchronization. Portfolio development will include animation reels and other products. Students will learn the processes of post-production and will work both independently and in small production teams to manage the production pipeline for a 3-D project. In the final phases of the project completion, students will work collaboratively to meet deadlines and will be expected to produce an animated final project that reflects competency with editing, rendering, updating reel, and self-promotional support items. Students may also develop a working game or app as a final project. Through the exploration of projects, students will continue to work independently and collaboratively to develop content delivery, story and technical mastery. Prerequisite: Principles and Concepts of Animation
    • Intership Forsyth (Work-Based Learning) Arts, A/V Technology, and Communications: Work-Based Learning placements represent the pinnacle of the Career-Related Education experience. To qualify for a WBL placement, a student must be at least 16 years old. Students must also have a defined Career Pathway in order to participate in a Work-Based Learning placement. This is especially important for successful completion of a student’s pathway in that their job placement is directly related to the curriculum of the pathway classes they have completed or in which they are concurrently enrolled.

    Graphic Design (A): Students will apply components for 2-D and 3-D animation elements ranging from storyboarding to mastering industry software tools; as well as, the physics and anatomy of motion, the technology of animation, and the uses of cameras and lighting.

    Student Plan of Study Guide: https://www.gadoe.org/Curriculum-Instruction-and-Assessment/CTAE/Documents/POS-AAVTC-Graphic-Design.pdf

    • Course 1: Introduction to Graphics and Design This course is designed as the foundational course for both the Graphics Production and Graphics Design pathways. The Graphics and Design course provides students with the processes involved in the technologies of printing, publishing, packaging, electronic imaging, and their allied industries. In addition, the Graphics and Design course offers a range of cognitive skills, aesthetics, and crafts that includes typography, visual arts, and page layout. Prerequisite: None
    • Course 2: Graphic Design and Production As the second course in the Graphics Communication and Graphics Design Pathways, this course builds on knowledge and skills learned in the Introduction to Graphics and Design course and focuses on procedures commonly used in the graphic communication and design industries. Students will gain more experience in creative problem solving and the practical implementation of those solutions across multiple areas of graphic design and graphic communications. Prerequisite: Introduction to Graphics and Design
    • Course 3: Advanced Graphic Design Students will continue to explore in an increasingly independent manner, the principles of design and layout procedures relating to the field of graphic design. Content will cover electronic systems and software programs used in graphic design, page composition, image conversion, and digital printing. Knowledge and skills in digital design and imaging will be enhanced through experiences that simulate the graphic design industry and school-based and work-based learning opportunities. Prerequisite: Graphic Design and Production
    • Internship Forsyth (Work-Based Learning) Arts, A/V Technology, and Communications: Work-Based Learning placements represent the pinnacle of the Career-Related Education experience. To qualify for a WBL placement, a student must be at least 16 years old. Students must also have a defined Career Pathway in order to participate in a Work-Based Learning placement. This is especially important for successful completion of a student’s pathway in that their job placement is directly related to the curriculum of the pathway classes they have completed or in which they are concurrently enrolled.
    b  
     
    Entrepreneurship Pathway (D, L, S): Students will align business goals that focus on planning, organizing, coordinating, and controlling the resources needed to produce and provide goods and/or services that lead to owning and operating a small business. 
     
    • Course 1: Introduction to Business and Technology This course is the foundational course for Business and Technology, Entrepreneurship, and Human Resources Management pathways. The course is designed for high school students as a gateway to the career pathways above, and provides an overview of business and technology skills required for today's business environment. Knowledge of business principles, the impact of financial decisions, and technology proficiencies demanded by business combine to establish the elements of this course. Emphasis is placed on developing proficient fundamental computer skills required for all career pathways. Students will learn essentials for working in a business environment, managing a business, and owning a business. The intention of this course is to prepare students to be successful both personally and professionally in an information-based society. Students will not only understand the concepts, but apply their knowledge to situations and defend their actions/decisions/choices through the knowledge and skills acquired in this course. Employability skills are integrated into activities, tasks, and projects throughout the course standards to demonstrate the skills required by business and industry. Competencies in the co-curricular student organization, Future Business Leaders of America (FBLA), are integral components of both the employability skills standards and content standards for this course. Prerequisite: None
    • Course 2: Legal Environment of Business  Legal Environment of Business addresses statutes and regulations affecting businesses, families, and individuals. All students will benefit with the knowledge of business law as they will eventually assume roles as citizens, workers, and consumers in their communities and in society at large. Students will get an overview of business law while concentrating on the legal aspects of business ownership and management. Legal issues addressed include court procedures, contracts, torts, consumer law, employment law, environmental law, international law, ethics, and the role of the government in business. Students will not only understand the concepts, but will also apply their knowledge to situations and defend their actions, decisions, and choices. Various forms of technologies will be highlighted to expose students to the emerging technologies impacting the business world. Professional communication skills and practices, problem-solving, ethical and legal issues, and the impact of effective presentation skills are expanded in this course to prepare students to be college and career ready. Employability skills are integrated into activities, tasks, and projects throughout this course to demonstrate skills required by business and industry. Competencies in the co-curricular student organization, Future Business Leaders of America (FBLA), are integral components of both the employability skills and content standards of this course. Legal Environment of Business is the second course in the Entrepreneurship and Human Resources Management pathway in the Business Management & Administration Cluster. Prerequisite: Introduction to Business and Technology
    • Course 3: Entrepreneurship Entrepreneurship focuses on recognizing a business opportunity, starting a business, operating and maintaining a business. Students will be exposed to the development of critical thinking, problem solving, and innovation in this course as they will either be the business owner or individuals working in a competitive job market in the future. Integration of accounting, finance, marketing, business management, legal and economic environments will be developed throughout projects in this course. Working to develop a business plan that includes structuring the organization, financing the organization, and managing information, operations, marketing, and human resources will be a focus in the course. Engaging students in the creation and management of a business and the challenges of being a small business owner will be fulfilled in this course. Various forms of technologies will be used to expose students to resources and application of business principles for starting, operating and maintaining a business. Professional communication skills and practices, problem-solving, ethical and legal issues, and the impact of effective presentation skills are enhanced in this course to prepare students to be college and career ready. Employability skills are integrated into activities, tasks, and projects throughout the course standards to demonstrate the skills required by business and industry. Competencies in the co-curricular student organization, Future Business Leaders of America (FBLA), are integral components of the employability skills standard for this course. Entrepreneurship is the third course in the pathway in the Business Management & Administration Cluster. Prerequisite: Legal Environment of Business
    • Internship Forsyth (Work-Based Learning) Business: Work-Based Learning placements represent the pinnacle of the Career-Related Education experience. To qualify for a WBL placement, a student must be at least 16 years old. Students must also have a defined Career Pathway in order to participate in a Work-Based Learning placement. This is especially important for successful completion of a student’s pathway in that their job placement is directly related to the curriculum of the pathway classes they have completed or in which they are concurrently enrolled.
    Human Resources Management Pathway (S): Students will focus on the staffing activities that involve planning, recruitment, selection, orientation, training, performance appraisal, compensation, and safety of employees; while, maintaining, monitoring, controlling, and planning the use of financial resources to ensure the financial well-being of a business.
     
    • Course 1: Introduction to Business and Technology This course is the foundational course for Business and Technology, Entrepreneurship, and Human Resources Management pathways. The course is designed for high school students as a gateway to the career pathways above, and provides an overview of business and technology skills required for today's business environment. Knowledge of business principles, the impact of financial decisions, and technology proficiencies demanded by business combine to establish the elements of this course. Emphasis is placed on developing proficient fundamental computer skills required for all career pathways. Students will learn essentials for working in a business environment, managing a business, and owning a business. The intention of this course is to prepare students to be successful both personally and professionally in an information-based society. Students will not only understand the concepts, but apply their knowledge to situations and defend their actions/decisions/choices through the knowledge and skills acquired in this course. Employability skills are integrated into activities, tasks, and projects throughout the course standards to demonstrate the skills required by business and industry. Competencies in the co-curricular student organization, Future Business Leaders of America (FBLA), are integral components of both the employability skills standards and content standards for this course. Prerequisite: None
    • Course 2: Legal Environment of Business This course addresses statutes and regulations affecting businesses, families, and individuals. All students will benefit with the knowledge of business law as they will eventually assume roles as citizens, workers, and consumers in their communities and in society at large. Students will get an overview of business law while concentrating on the legal aspects of business ownership and management. Legal issues addressed include court procedures, contracts, torts, consumer law, employment law, environmental law, international law, ethics, and the role of the government in business. Students will not only understand the concepts, but will also apply their knowledge to situations and defend their actions, decisions, and choices. Various forms of technologies will be highlighted to expose students to the emerging technologies impacting the business world. Professional communication skills and practices, problem-solving, ethical and legal issues, and the impact of effective presentation skills are expanded in this course to prepare students to be college and career ready. Employability skills are integrated into activities, tasks, and projects throughout this course to demonstrate skills required by business and industry. Competencies in the co-curricular student organization, Future Business Leaders of America (FBLA), are integral components of both the employability skills and content standards of this course. Legal Environment of Business is the second course in the Entrepreneurship and Human Resources Management pathway in the Business Management & Administration Cluster. Prerequisite: Introduction to Business and Technology
    • Course 3: Human Resources Principles The course is designed to equip students with operational knowledge of hiring, managing, and firing employees. Throughout this course students will be introduced to the Human Resource Management role by following the life cycle of an employee from organizational entry to exit. Various forms of technologies will be highlighted to expose students to the emerging technologies impacting the business world. Professional communication skills and practices, problem-solving, ethical and legal issues, and the impact of effective presentation skills are taught in this course as a foundational knowledge to prepare students to be college and career ready. Employability skills are integrated into activities, tasks, and projects throughout the course standards to demonstrate the skills required by business and industry. Competencies in the co-curricular student organization, Future Business Leaders of America (FBLA), are integral components of both the employability skills standards and content standards for this course.  Prerequisite: Legal Environment of Business
    • Internship Forsyth (Work-Based Learning) Business: Work-Based Learning placements represent the pinnacle of the Career-Related Education experience. To qualify for a WBL placement, a student must be at least 16 years old. Students must also have a defined Career Pathway in order to participate in a Work-Based Learning placement. This is especially important for successful completion of a student’s pathway in that their job placement is directly related to the curriculum of the pathway classes they have completed or in which they are concurrently enrolled.
    t
     
    Teaching as a Profession Pathway (C, D, L, N, S, W): The pathway will prepare students to plan, manage, and provide education and training services, and related learning support services such as administration, teaching/training, administrative support, and professional support services. Students will examine the teaching profession, study contemporary issues in education, and participate actively in an internship with a teacher mentor. 
     
    • Course 1: Examining the Teaching Profession This is the foundational course under the Teaching as a Profession pathway and prepares students for future positions in the field of education. Teaching as a Profession students study, apply, and practice the use of current technologies, effective teaching and learning strategies, the creation of an effective learning environment, the creation of instructional opportunities for diverse learners and students with special needs, and plan instruction based on knowledge of subject matter, students, community, and curriculum performance standards. Pre-requisite for this course is adviser approval. Prerequisite: None
    • Course 2: Contemporary Issues in Education This course engages the candidate in observations, interactions, and analyses of critical and contemporary educational issues. The candidate will investigate issues influencing the social and political contexts of educational settings in Georgia and the United States and actively examines the teaching profession from multiple vantage points both within and outside of the school. Against this backdrop, the candidate will reflect on and interpret the meaning of education and schooling in a diverse culture and examine the moral and ethical responsibilities of teaching in a democracy. (Mastery of standards through project based learning, technical skills practice, and leadership development activities of the career and technical student organization Future Educators of America (FEA) will provide students with a competitive edge for either entry into the education global marketplace and/or the post-secondary institution of their choice to continue their education and training). Prerequisite: Examining the Teaching Profession
    • Course 2: Teaching as a Profession Practicum The practicum offers a candidate in the Teaching as a Profession career pathway a field experience under the direct supervision of a certified teacher (mentor teacher). The practicum stresses observing, analyzing and classifying activities of the mentor teacher and comparing personal traits with those of successful teachers. The candidate intern will develop a portfolio of their skills, plan and teach a lesson or lessons, understand and practice confidentiality as it pertains to the teaching profession, meet the needs of students with special needs, maintain the safety of the students, practice professionalism, and demonstrate ethical behavior. Mastery of standards through project based learning, technical skills practice, and leadership development activities of the career and technical student organization Future Educators of America (FEA) or Family, Career & Community Leaders of America (FCCLA) will provide students with a competitive edge for either entry into the education global marketplace and/or the post-secondary institution of their choice to continue their education and training. Prerequisite: Contemporary Issues in Education
    • Internship Forsyth (Work-Based Learning) Education: Work-Based Learning placements represent the pinnacle of the Career-Related Education experience. To qualify for a WBL placement, a student must be at least 16 years old. Students must also have a defined Career Pathway in order to participate in a Work-Based Learning placement. This is especially important for successful completion of a student’s pathway in that their job placement is directly related to the curriculum of the pathway classes they have completed or in which they are concurrently enrolled.

    ever

     
    Energy Systems Pathway (A): Energy is a diverse field with many job opportunities. There are many people who help generate energy, transport it and connec energy to the things we use everyday. There are also individuals creating new methods of energy generation. Working in energy can mean working for utilities, for gas and oil companies, for government and research groups, for energy education or environmental regulation agencies, for nonprofit energy awareness and conservation organizations or for many other energy related agencies.
     
    • Course 1: Foundations of Energy Technologies This course explores the relationship between force, work, energy, and power. Students study the characteristics, availability, conversion, control, transmission, and storage of energy and power, as well as examine and apply the principles of electrical, fluid, and mechanical power. Students research renewable, nonrenewable, and inexhaustible resources and conservation efforts. Using their courseacquired skills, students will further understand the many careers that exist in energy and related technologies.  Prerequisite: None
    • Course 2: Energy and Power Technology This course explores the relationship between force, work, energy, and power. Students study the characteristics, availability, conversion, control, transmission, and storage of energy and power. Students will explore and apply the principles of electrical and mechanical power systems. Students will research renewable, non-renewable resources and conservation efforts. Students will develop an awareness of the many careers that exist in energy and related technologies and their related safety regulations. Prerequisite: Foundations of Energy Technologies
    • Course 3: Appropriate and Alternative Energy Technologies In this course, students will develop an understanding of the differences between nonrenewable and renewable energy sources and how these energy sources affect their world. Alternative energy sources will be researched to include the regional implications and economic, environmental, and sustainability issues. Students will evaluate the positive and negative impacts of nuclear power and its relevancy to various situations in today’s society. Students will explore future trends of energy, power, and transportation. Students will develop, through research, an alternative energy system that will demonstrate their understanding of a unique, as well as appropriate, approach to energy generation. Prerequisite: Energy and Power Technology
    • Internship Forsyth (Work-Based Learning) Energy: Work-Based Learning placements represent the pinnacle of the Career-Related Education experience. To qualify for a WBL placement, a student must be at least 16 years old. Students must also have a defined Career Pathway in order to participate in a Work-Based Learning placement. This is especially important for successful completion of a student’s pathway in that their job placement is directly related to the curriculum of the pathway classes they have completed or in which they are concurrently enrolled.
    b
     
    Advanced Accounting Pathway (L): Students will build skills related to making strategic decisions to report, obtain, save, protect, and grow the financial assets of businesses and individuals. Finance students will use computation, analytical, and interpersonal skills to record, classify, summarize, analyze, and communicate a business' financial information/business transactions for use in management decision making.
     
    • Course 1: Introduction to Business and Technology This is the foundational course for Advanced Accounting, Business Accounting, and Financial Services pathways. The course is designed for high school students as a gateway to the career pathways above, and provides an overview of business and technology skills required for today's business environment. Knowledge of business principles, the impact of financial decisions, and technology proficiencies demanded by business combine to establish the elements of this course. Emphasis is placed on developing proficient fundamental computer skills required for all career pathways. Students will learn essentials for working in a business environment, managing a business, and owning a business. The intention of this course is to prepare students to be successful both personally and professionally in an information-based society. Students will not only understand the concepts, but apply their knowledge to situations and defend their actions/decisions/choices through the knowledge and skills acquired in this course. Employability skills are integrated into activities, tasks, and projects throughout the course standards to demonstrate the skills required by business and industry. Competencies in the co-curricular student organization, Future Business Leaders of America (FBLA), are integral components of both the employability skills standards and content standards for this course.  Prerequisite: None
    • Course 2: Principles of Accounting 1 Principles of Accounting 1 is a skill-level course that is of value to all students pursuing a strong background in business, marketing, and management. Using financial information, students will learn how to make decisions about planning, organizing, and allocating resources using accounting procedures. Performing accounting activities for sole proprietorships and corporations following Generally-Accepted Accounting Procedures are included in the course. Students analyze business transactions and financial statements, perform payroll, and evaluate the effects of transactions on the economic health of a business. Various forms of technologies and internet research will be highlighted to expose students to the resources available when learning the language of business. Employability skills are integrated into activities, tasks, and projects throughout the course standards to demonstrate the skills required by business and industry. Competencies in the co-curricular student organization, Future Business Leaders of America (FBLA), are integral components of the employability skills  standard for this course. Principles of Accounting 1 may be the second course in the Advanced Business Pathway or the third course in the Business Accounting pathway in the Finance Cluster. Students enrolled in this course should have successfully completed Introduction to Business & Technology. If students are completing the Business Accounting pathway, successful completion of the Financial Literacy course prepares students to take an End of Pathway assessment in this career area. Prerequisite: Introduction to Business and Technology
    • Course 3: Principles of Accounting 2 Students build on the knowledge acquired in Principles of Accounting I as they further 
      their studies in accounting. Students perform accounting activities for partnerships and 
      corporations following generally accepted accounting procedures. Uncollectible 
      accounts, plant assets, inventory, notes payable and receivable, prepared and accrued 
      expenses, and unearned and accrued revenues are analyzed and related adjustments are 
      calculated. Students apply accounting procedures to the formation, dissolution, and liquidation of business entities. In addition, students apply managerial accounting 
      techniques. Competencies for the co-curricular student organization Future Business 
      Leaders of America (FBLA) are integral components of the performance standards. 
      FBLA activities should be incorporated throughout instructional strategies developed for 
      the course. Prerequisite: Principles of Accounting 1
       
       
    • Internship Forsyth (Work-Based Learning) Finance: Work-Based Learning placements represent the pinnacle of the Career-Related Education experience. To qualify for a WBL placement, a student must be at least 16 years old. Students must also have a defined Career Pathway in order to participate in a Work-Based Learning placement. This is especially important for successful completion of a student’s pathway in that their job placement is directly related to the curriculum of the pathway classes they have completed or in which they are concurrently enrolled.
    Business Accounting (L): Students will learn the language of business and financial literacy to navigate financial decisions and make informed choices related to managing finances and budgeting, saving and investing, living independently, earning and reporting income, buying goods and services, using credit, banking, and protecting against risk.
     
    • Course 1: Introduction to Business and Technology This course is the foundational course for Advanced Accounting, Business Accounting, and Financial Services pathways. The course is designed for high school students as a gateway to the career pathways above, and provides an overview of business and technology skills required for today's business environment. Knowledge of business principles, the impact of financial decisions, and technology proficiencies demanded by business combine to establish the elements of this course. Emphasis is placed on developing proficient fundamental computer skills required for all career pathways. Students will learn essentials for working in a business environment, managing a business, and owning a business. The intention of this course is to prepare students to be successful both personally and professionally in an information-based society. Prerequisite: None
    • Course 2: Financial Literacy This course is specifically designed for high school students to understand the importance of the financial world, including planning and managing money wisely. Areas of study taught through application in personal finance include sources of income, budgeting, banking, consumer credit, credit laws and rights, personal bankruptcy, insurance, spending, taxes, investment strategies, savings accounts, mutual funds and the stock market, buying a vehicle, and living independently. Based on the hands-on skills and knowledge applied in this course, students will develop financial goals, and create realistic and measurable objectives to be MONEY SMART! Prerequisite: Introduction to Business and Technology
    • Course 3: Principles of Accounting 1 is a skill-level course that is of value to all students pursuing a strong background in business, marketing, and management. Using financial information, students will learn how to make decisions about planning, organizing, and allocating resources using accounting procedures. Performing accounting activities for sole proprietorships and corporations following Generally-Accepted Accounting Procedures are included in the course. Students analyze business transactions and financial statements, perform payroll, and evaluate the effects of transactions on the economic health of a business. Various forms of technologies and internet research will be highlighted to expose students to the resources available when learning the language of business. Employability skills are integrated into activities, tasks, and projects throughout the course standards to demonstrate the skills required by business and industry. Competencies in the co-curricular student organization, Future Business Leaders of America (FBLA), are integral components of the employability skills 
       
      standard for this course. Principles of Accounting 1 may be the second course in the Advanced Business Pathway or the third course in the Business Accounting pathway in the Finance Cluster. Students enrolled in this course should have successfully completed Introduction to Business & Technology. If students are completing the Business Accounting pathway, successful completion of the Financial Literacy course prepares students to take an End of Pathway assessment in this career area. Prerequisite: Financial Literacy
    • Internship Forsyth (Work-Based Learning) Finance: Work-Based Learning placements represent the pinnacle of the Career-Related Education experience. To qualify for a WBL placement, a student must be at least 16 years old. Students must also have a defined Career Pathway in order to participate in a Work-Based Learning placement. This is especially important for successful completion of a student’s pathway in that their job placement is directly related to the curriculum of the pathway classes they have completed or in which they are concurrently enrolled.
    Financial Services Pathway (D, L): Students will practice computation, analytical and interpersonal skills that are applied to banking, overseeing investments, managing insurance, and financial planning. Students will learn industry skills that are used by businesses and individuals to manage their money, investments, loans, stock or commodity markets, and credit. Students will learn skills to protect individuals and businesses from financial losses; and deliver services and products that transfer risk from an individual or business to an insurance company.
     
    • Course 1: Introduction to Business and Technology This course is the foundational course for Advanced Accounting, Business Accounting, and Financial Services pathways. The course is designed for high school students as a gateway to the career pathways above, and provides an overview of business and technology skills required for today's business environment. Knowledge of business principles, the impact of financial decisions, and technology proficiencies demanded by business combine to establish the elements of this course. Emphasis is placed on developing proficient fundamental computer skills required for all career pathways. Students will learn essentials for working in a business environment, managing a business, and owning a business. The intention of this course is to prepare students to be successful both personally and professionally in an information-based society. Students will not only understand the concepts, but apply their knowledge to situations and defend their actions/decisions/choices through the knowledge and skills acquired in this course. Employability skills are integrated into activities, tasks, and projects throughout the course standards to demonstrate the skills required by business and industry. Competencies in the co-curricular student organization, Future Business Leaders of America (FBLA), are integral components of both the employability skills standards and content standards for this course. Prerequisite: None
    • Course 2: Financial Literacy This course is specifically designed for high school students to understand the importance of the financial world, including planning and managing money wisely. Areas of study taught through application in personal finance include sources of income, budgeting, banking, consumer credit, credit laws and rights, personal bankruptcy, insurance, spending, taxes, investment strategies, savings accounts, mutual funds and the stock market, buying a vehicle, and living independently. Based on the hands-on skills and knowledge applied in this course, students will develop financial goals, and create realistic and measurable objectives to be MONEY SMART! Prerequisite: Introduction to Business and Technology
    • Course 3: Banking, Investing, and Insurance Explore the financial world as students dive into the main areas of financial services, including banking, investing, and insurance. Basics of banking and credit include a brief history of money and banking, negotiable instruments, creation of credit, and the function of banks. Methods for measuring the financial performance of financial institutions are analyzed. Students will be introduced to a variety of investment options and learn to determine the appropriate options for an investment goal. By analyzing financial reports and employing other tools to predict growth rates and return on investment, students will develop strategies to produce financial growth strategies for a business. Prerequisite: Financial Literacy
    • Internship Forsyth (Work-Based Learning) Finance: Work-Based Learning placements represent the pinnacle of the Career-Related Education experience. To qualify for a WBL placement, a student must be at least 16 years old. Students must also have a defined Career Pathway in order to participate in a Work-Based Learning placement. This is especially important for successful completion of a student’s pathway in that their job placement is directly related to the curriculum of the pathway classes they have completed or in which they are concurrently enrolled.
    jr
     
    JROTC Pathway - Marines (N): JROTC pathways offer students the opportunity to enroll in a leadership/citizenship program, while instilling self-esteem, teamwork, and self-discipline. 
     
    • Year 1: Leadership Education 1 (JROTC I) and Leadership Education 2 (JROTC II) The MCJROTC program prepares high school students for responsible leadership roles while making students aware of their rights, responsibilities and privileges as American Citizens. The program is a stimulus for promoting graduation from high school and the need for continuing education. It provides instruction in Leadership Traits and Principles; Military History; First Aid; Public Speaking; Drill; Physical Training; and Personal Appearance. Successful completion of MJROTC LE 1 – LE 111 will satisfy the initial Health and Physical Education graduation requirements. LE 2 is a continuation of leadership training. Novice leaders develop their social interaction and interpersonal relationships in practical situations of leadership and physical training. Instruction includes Fundamentals, Types, Temptations and Tasks of Leadership; Authority and Responsibility; Organization of the Marine Corps; the Role of Noncommissioned Officers; Military Justice; Drill; Uniform Inspections; Marksmanship; and Physical Fitness. Successful completion of MJROTC LE 1 – LE 111 will satisfy the initial Health and Physical Education graduation requirements.
    • Year 2: Leadership Education 3 (JROTC III) and Leadership Education 4 (JROTC IV) LE 3 commences Intermediate Leadership Training. Third semester cadets use their acquired knowledge and experience to direct lower level cadets. Students begin training to assume positions of increased responsibility. Classes include the Role of Officers; Fundamentals of Command and Management; Studies in Equal Opportunity and Harassment; Land Navigation; Inspection Procedures; Directed Reading; and Study of World Ideologies. Successful completion of MJROTC LE 1 – LE 111 will satisfy the initial Health and Physical Education graduation requirements. LE 4 increases cadets’ exposure to command responsibilities. LE 4 cadets exercise leadership authority and responsibility over junior cadets and perform staff functions. Studies include Directed Reading; Staff Functions; TQM; and the practical application of management and leadership principles through the planning and execution of projects that aid the local community.
    • Year 3: Leadership Education 5 (JROTC V) and Leadership Education 6 (JROTC VI) LE 5 is the initial level of Senior Leadership Training. Selected cadets serve in key billets within the cadet command structure. The curriculum concentrates in the areas of Effective Communication Skills, Leadership and Managerial techniques (with emphasis on the development of subordinate leaders), staff functions, and assisting in MCJROTC instruction. Studies include Communications, Advanced Leadership, Principles of Management, and Command and Staff Functions. LE 6 is the second level of Senior Leadership Training. Cadets can progress to senior positions (i.e., leadership and managerial responsibility within the cadet command group and staff officer billets.)  The expanded curriculum concentrates on the areas of Communications, Leadership and Managerial techniques. The majority of classroom time is devoted to skills, which serve to develop subordinate leaders, assisting in MCJROTC classes and refining interpersonal skills. Studies include Advanced Techniques of Communications, Advanced Leadership, Principles of Management, and Command and Staff Functions.
    • Year 4: Leadership Education 7 (JROTC VII) and Leadership Education 8 (JROTC VIII) LE 7 is Advanced Leadership Training. Emphasis is placed on the expanded development and demonstration of skills required to lead the cadet command. Classes and activities include continued citizenship responsibilities, leadership skills, military traditions, fiscal responsibility and the role of Naval Power within the national strategy. Opportunities for providing service to the local community through civic service projects are introduced. LE 8 is the final course in the MCJROTC curriculum. Cadets reaching this level will continue to develop citizen skills and leadership styles and techniques which will prepare them for post high school experiences. A formal research paper entitled, “My Leadership Credo” is required. This assignment will require cadets to describe their personal feelings and beliefs about the leadership styles and techniques they try to emulate in exercising their responsibilities as citizens.

    hs

    Biotechnology Research & Development Pathway (C/STEM, L):  Students will acquire the skills and knowledge required in bioscience human health research and development, and learn how scientists study new disease treatments and invent medical devices to assist patients and improve the accuracy of diagnostic tests.
     
    • Course 1: Introduction to Healthcare Science Introduction to Healthcare Science is the foundational course for all Health Science pathways and is a prerequisite for all other Healthcare Science pathway courses. This course will enable students to receive initial exposure to the many Healthcare Science careers as well as employability, communication, and technology skills necessary in the healthcare industry. The concepts of human growth and development, interaction with patients and family members, health, wellness, and preventative care are evaluated, as well as the legal, ethical responsibilities of today’s healthcare provider. Fundamental healthcare skills development is initiated including microbiology, basic life support and first aid. This course will provide students with a competitive edge to be the better candidate for either entry into the healthcare global marketplace and/or the post-secondary institution of their choice to continue their education and training. The pre-requisite for this course is advisor approval.  Prerequisite: None
    • Course 2: Essentials of Biotechnology This is the second course in the career pathway that introduces students to the broad understanding of the fundamentals of biotechnology and the impact on society. The knowledge and skills in this course provides a basic overview of current trends and careers in biotechnology, with an emphasis on basic laboratory skills, along with the business, regulatory, and ethical aspects of biotechnology. The prerequisite for the course is Introduction to Healthcare Science Technology. Prerequisite: Introduction to Healthcare Science
    • Course 3: Applications of Biotechnology Students This course further introduces students to the fundamentals of biotechnology. Included in this course are additional applications and techniques in biotechnology that expand and increase the student’s comprehension of how biotechnology utilizes living systems to create products and enhance lives. In addition, laboratory applications learned in this course form the pivotal component distinguishing science theory from application in bioscience, like that of engineering and mathematics. Bioscience and the application of laboratory technique to the manipulation of living systems is a cornerstone of pharmaceutical, medical device, forensic science, environmental science, agriculture, alternative fuel, and green chemistry. Prerequisite: Essentials of Biotechnology
    • Internship Forsyth (Work-Based Learning) Healthcare: Work-Based Learning placements represent the pinnacle of the Career-Related Education experience. To qualify for a WBL placement, a student must be at least 16 years old. Students must also have a defined Career Pathway in order to participate in a Work-Based Learning placement. This is especially important for successful completion of a student’s pathway in that their job placement is directly related to the curriculum of the pathway classes they have completed or in which they are concurrently enrolled.
    Emergency Medical Responder (A):  Students will learn how to protect the public in an emergency event, including being the first responder at the scene of a traffic accident or medical emergency that requires putting out a fire, treating injuries, and other vital functions.
     
    • Course 1: Introduction to Healthcare Science Introduction to Healthcare Science is the foundational course for all Health Science pathways 
      and is a prerequisite for all other Healthcare Science pathway courses. This course will enable students to receive initial exposure to the many Healthcare Science careers as well as employability, communication, and technology skills necessary in the healthcare industry. The concepts of human growth and development, interaction with patients and family members, health, wellness, and preventative care are evaluated, as well as the legal, ethical responsibilities of today’s healthcare provider. Fundamental healthcare skills development is initiated including microbiology, basic life support and first aid. This course will provide students with a competitive edge to be the better candidate for either entry into the healthcare global marketplace and/or the post-secondary institution of their choice to continue their education and training. The pre-requisite for this course is advisor approval.  Prerequisite: None
    • Course 2: Essentials of Healthcare Anatomy and Physiology is a vital part of most healthcare post-secondary education programs. The Essentials of Healthcare is a medical-focused anatomy course addressing the physiology of each body system, along with the investigation of common diseases, disorders and emerging diseases. The prevention of disease and the diagnosis and treatment that might be utilized are addressed, along with medical terminology related to each system. This course provides an opportunity to demonstrate technical skills that enforce the goal of helping students make connections between medical procedures and the pathophysiology of diseases and disorders. The pre-requisite for this course is Introduction to Healthcare. Prerequisite: Introduction to Healthcare Science.
    • Course 3: Emergency Medical Responder The Emergency Medical Responder (EMR) course prepares the student to provide initial stabilizing care to the sick or injured prior to the arrival of Emergency Medical Services Professionals (EMS), and to assist EMS personnel in transporting patients for definitive care at an appropriate hospital/facility. Major areas of instruction include Introductory Medical Terminology and Anatomy & Physiology; Responder Safety; Incident Command; Blood-borne Pathogen Training; Basic Physical Assessment; and Treatment of Trauma and Medical Emergencies; Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation and the use of Automatic External Defibrillators (AEDs). The course is a blend of lecture, hands on lab/learning, and practical scenario-based learning/testing. Prerequisite: Essentials of Healthcare
    • Internship Forsyth (Work-Based Learning) Healthcare: Work-Based Learning placements represent the pinnacle of the Career-Related Education experience. To qualify for a WBL placement, a student must be at least 16 years old. Students must also have a defined Career Pathway in order to participate in a Work-Based Learning placement. This is especially important for successful completion of a student’s pathway in that their job placement is directly related to the curriculum of the pathway classes they have completed or in which they are concurrently enrolled.
    Phlebotomy Pathway (L):  Students will learn the safety and techniques used in phlebotomy, and the skills and knowledge require for infection control. Phlebotomists draw blood for tests, transfusions, donations, and research. They explain procedures to patients and assist in the recovery of patients with adverse reactions. Phlebotomist opportunities are expected to grow 17% nationally, with job openings for qualified phlebotomists to increase to 6,580 between 2010 and 2020. Employment in the healthcare industry is favorable for those who are qualified.
     
    • Course 1: Introduction to Healthcare Science Introduction to Healthcare Science is the foundational course for all Health Science pathways 
      and is a prerequisite for all other Healthcare Science pathway courses. This course will enable students to receive initial exposure to the many Healthcare Science careers as well as employability, communication, and technology skills necessary in the healthcare industry. The concepts of human growth and development, interaction with patients and family members, health, wellness, and preventative care are evaluated, as well as the legal, ethical responsibilities of today’s healthcare provider. Fundamental healthcare skills development is initiated including microbiology, basic life support and first aid. This course will provide students with a competitive edge to be the better candidate for either entry into the healthcare global marketplace and/or the post-secondary institution of their choice to continue their education and training. The pre-requisite for this course is advisor approval. Prerequisite: None
    • Course 2: Essentials of Healthcare Anatomy and Physiology is a vital part of most healthcare post-secondary education programs. The Essentials of Healthcare is a medical-focused anatomy course addressing the physiology of each body system, along with the investigation of common diseases, disorders and emerging diseases. The prevention of disease and the diagnosis and treatment that might be utilized are addressed, along with medical terminology related to each system. This course provides an opportunity to demonstrate technical skills that enforce the goal of helping students make connections between medical procedures and the pathophysiology of diseases and disorders. The pre-requisite for this course is Introduction to Healthcare. Prerequisite: Introduction to Healthcare Science.
    • Course 3: Diagnostics Phlebotomy This course is designed to help students become prepared for the phlebotomy technician certification exam, upon completion of all required components. Topics covered in this course include employability skills, careers, terminology and equipment, safety and compliance, quality assurance, site-specific anatomy, patient preparation for venipuncture, performing of venipuncture, and special processing and transport. During this course, simulated venipuncture may be performed. However, for national certification, live sticks are required. The certifying agencies may allow a provisional certification with the live stick requirement being completed after high school graduation. Prerequisite: Essentials of Healthcare
    • Internship Forsyth (Work-Based Learning) Healthcare: Work-Based Learning placements represent the pinnacle of the Career-Related Education experience. To qualify for a WBL placement, a student must be at least 16 years old. Students must also have a defined Career Pathway in order to participate in a Work-Based Learning placement. This is especially important for successful completion of a student’s pathway in that their job placement is directly related to the curriculum of the pathway classes they have completed or in which they are concurrently enrolled.
    Health Information Technology (A):  Students will learn the skills used for electronic medical records, the Health Information Exchange, telemedicine, mobile apps and kiosks, and other technology used in the healthcare field.
     
    • Course 1: Introduction to Healthcare Science Introduction to Healthcare Science is the foundational course for all Health Science pathways and is a prerequisite for all other Healthcare Science pathway courses. This course will enable students to receive initial exposure to the many Healthcare Science careers as well as employability, communication, and technology skills necessary in the healthcare industry. The concepts of human growth and development, interaction with patients and family members, health, wellness, and preventative care are evaluated, as well as the legal, ethical responsibilities of today’s healthcare provider. Fundamental healthcare skills development is initiated including microbiology, basic life support and first aid. This course will provide students with a competitive edge to be the better candidate for either entry into the healthcare global marketplace and/or the post-secondary institution of their choice to continue their education and training. The pre-requisite for this course is advisor approval.  Prerequisite: None
    • Course 2: Essentials of Health Information Technology Students will analyze the larger role that technology and information technology play in the healthcare system, the impact that technology has on the healthcare field, and which careers will be available due to these changes. Terminology utilized in Health IT will be discussed, including Electronic Medical Records (EMR), Electronic Health Records (EHR), Health Informatics, and Health Information Management (HIM). The impact of the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA), Health Information Technology for Economic and Clinical Health Act (HITECH), and future legislation act will be evaluated. Students will also investigate the advancement of mobile technology (mhealth) and telemedicine, as well as the benefits. Classrooms should be equipped with technology to embrace the Health IT environment.  Prerequisite: Introduction to Healthcare Science.
    • Course 3: Applications of Health Information Technology In this course, students will analyze the three main groups of HIT applications in hospitals and the clinical functions. The importance of patient confidentiality and security will be analyzed, as well the challenges involved with the Health Information Exchange implementation. Students will research the HIT project-life cycle and HIT project-management components and stages. Further exploration of telemedicine and the use of electronic health records will be demonstrated in this course. Simulated lab experiences may be utilized. Prerequisite: Essentials of Health Information Technology
    • Internship Forsyth (Work-Based Learning) Healthcare: Work-Based Learning placements represent the pinnacle of the Career-Related Education experience. To qualify for a WBL placement, a student must be at least 16 years old. Students must also have a defined Career Pathway in order to participate in a Work-Based Learning placement. This is especially important for successful completion of a student’s pathway in that their job placement is directly related to the curriculum of the pathway classes they have completed or in which they are concurrently enrolled.

    Sports Medicine Pathway (N):  Students will apply the care, treatment, counseling, and health education information related to a career in sports medicine; as well as injury prevention and skills used in an athletic trainer role.

    Student Program of Study Guide: https://www.gadoe.org/Curriculum-Instruction-and-Assessment/CTAE/Documents/POS-Health-Science-Therapeutic-Services-Sports-Medicine.pdf

    • Course 1: Introduction to Healthcare Science Introduction to Healthcare Science is the foundational course for all Health Science pathways and is a prerequisite for all other Healthcare Science pathway courses. This course will enable students to receive initial exposure to the many Healthcare Science careers as well as employability, communication, and technology skills necessary in the healthcare industry. The concepts of human growth and development, interaction with patients and family members, health, wellness, and preventative care are evaluated, as well as the legal, ethical responsibilities of today’s healthcare provider. Fundamental healthcare skills development is initiated including microbiology, basic life support and first aid. This course will provide students with a competitive edge to be the better candidate for either entry into the healthcare global marketplace and/or the post-secondary institution of their choice to continue their education and training. Prerequisite: None
    • Course 2: Essentials of Healthcare Anatomy and Physiology is a vital part of most healthcare post-secondary education programs. The Essentials of Healthcare is a medical-focused anatomy course addressing the physiology of each body system, along with the investigation of common diseases, disorders and emerging diseases. The prevention of disease and the diagnosis and treatment that might be utilized are addressed, along with medical terminology related to each system. This course provides an opportunity to demonstrate technical skills that enforce the goal of helping students make connections between medical procedures and the pathophysiology of diseases and disorders. Prerequisite:  Introduction to Healthcare
    • Course 3: Sports Medicine Sports Medicine is the third course in the Therapeutic Services/Sports Medicine Career Pathway. The course is appropriate for students who wish to pursue a career in healthcare with a focus on the musculoskeletal system, injury assessment, injury prevention, or rehabilitation including careers in Sports Medicine and Rehabilitative Services. This course will enable students to receive initial exposure to therapeutic services skills and attitudes applicable to the healthcare industry. The concepts of anatomy and physiology, assessment, preventative and rehabilitative care are introduced. Fundamental healthcare skills development is initiated, including medical terminology, kinesiology, patient assessment, record keeping, and basic life support. Prerequisite: Essentials of Healthcare
    • Internship Forsyth (Work-Based Learning) Healthcare: Work-Based Learning placements represent the pinnacle of the Career-Related Education experience. To qualify for a WBL placement, a student must be at least 16 years old. Students must also have a defined Career Pathway in order to participate in a Work-Based Learning placement. This is especially important for successful completion of a student’s pathway in that their job placement is directly related to the curriculum of the pathway classes they have completed or in which they are concurrently enrolled.

    Therapeutic Services/Pharmacy (N):  Students will about changing the health status of the patient over time. Health professionals in this pathway work directly with patients providing care, treatment, counseling and health  education information.  National labor market information indicates that eight  out of the top twenty fastest‐growing occupations are in the Health Science industry.  Pharmacists dispense prescription medications to patients and offer advice on  their safe use.  Pharmacists work in pharmacies, including those in grocery and  drug stores and hospitals and clinics. 

    Student Program of Study Guide: https://www.gadoe.org/Curriculum-Instruction-and-Assessment/CTAE/Documents/POS-Health-Science-Therapeutic-Services-Pharmacy.pdf

    • Course 1: Introduction to Healthcare Science Introduction to Healthcare Science is the foundational course for all Health Science pathways and is a prerequisite for all other Healthcare Science pathway courses. This course will enable students to receive initial exposure to the many Healthcare Science careers as well as employability, communication, and technology skills necessary in the healthcare industry. The concepts of human growth and development, interaction with patients and family members, health, wellness, and preventative care are evaluated, as well as the legal, ethical responsibilities of today’s healthcare provider. Fundamental healthcare skills development is initiated including microbiology, basic life support and first aid. This course will provide students with a competitive edge to be the better candidate for either entry into the healthcare global marketplace and/or the post-secondary institution of their choice to continue their education and training. Prerequisite: None
    • Course 2: Essentials of Healthcare Anatomy and Physiology is a vital part of most healthcare post-secondary education programs. The Essentials of Healthcare is a medical-focused anatomy course addressing the physiology of each body system, along with the investigation of common diseases, disorders and emerging diseases. The prevention of disease and the diagnosis and treatment that might be utilized are addressed, along with medical terminology related to each system. This course provides an opportunity to demonstrate technical skills that enforce the goal of helping students make connections between medical procedures and the pathophysiology of diseases and disorders. Prerequisite:  Introduction to Healthcare
    • Course 3: Pharmacy Operations and Fundamentals This course is an introduction to pharmacy technology professions, employment opportunities, and basic pre-pharmacy technician skills which may be utilized in either clinical or community settings such as retail, home health care, and ambulatory care pharmacies.  Intensive pharmacy specific safety and security training are provided including potential drug addiction and abuse issues relative to pharmaceutical care such as robberies and identification of forgeries. Prerequisite: Essentials of Healthcare
    • Internship Forsyth (Work-Based Learning) Healthcare: Work-Based Learning placements represent the pinnacle of the Career-Related Education experience. To qualify for a WBL placement, a student must be at least 16 years old. Students must also have a defined Career Pathway in order to participate in a Work-Based Learning placement. This is especially important for successful completion of a student’s pathway in that their job placement is directly related to the curriculum of the pathway classes they have completed or in which they are concurrently enrolled.
    ca
     
    Culinary Arts Pathway (D, L, S, W):  Students will complete a variety of skills required by the restaurant and food industry such as knife skills, cooking techniques, menu planning, food purchasing and costing, food safety and sanitation, and front of the house service. 
     
    • Course 1: Introduction to Culinary Arts Introduction to Culinary Arts is the foundational course designed to introduce students to fundamental food preparation terms, concepts, and methods in Culinary Arts where laboratory practice will parallel class work. Fundamental techniques, skills, and terminology are covered and mastered with an emphasis on basic kitchen and dining room safety, sanitation, equipment 
      maintenance and operation procedures. The course also provides an overview of the professionalism in the culinary industry and career opportunities leading into a career pathway to Culinary Arts. Mastery of standards through project-based learning, technical skills practice, and leadership development activities of Family, Career and Community Leaders of America, (FCCLA) will provide students with a competitive edge for either entry into the education global marketplace and/or the post-secondary institution of their choice to continue their education and training. Prerequisite: None
    • Course 2: Culinary Arts I As the second course in the Culinary Arts Career Pathway, the prerequisite for this course is Introduction to Culinary Arts. Culinary Arts I is designed to create a complete foundation and understanding of Culinary Arts leading to postsecondary education or a food-service career. This fundamentals course begins to involve in-depth knowledge and hands-on skill mastery of culinary arts. Prerequisite: Introduction to Culinary Arts
    • Course 3: Culinary Arts II As the third course in the Culinary Arts Pathway, the prerequisite for this course is Culinary Arts I. Culinary Arts II is an advanced and rigorous in-depth course designed for the student who is continuing in the Culinary Arts Pathway and wishes to continue their education at the postsecondary level or enter the food-service industry as a proficient and well-rounded individual. Strong importance is given to refining hands-on production of the classic fundamentals in the commercial kitchen. Prerequisite: Culinary Arts I
    • Internship Forsyth (Work-Based Learning) Culinary Arts: Work-Based Learning placements represent the pinnacle of the Career-Related Education experience. To qualify for a WBL placement, a student must be at least 16 years old. Students must also have a defined Career Pathway in order to participate in a Work-Based Learning placement. This is especially important for successful completion of a student’s pathway in that their job placement is directly related to the curriculum of the pathway classes they have completed or in which they are concurrently enrolled.

    hosp

    Hospitality, Recreation, & Tourism Pathway (A): Georgia represents the 8th largest tourism economy in the country and the 2nd largest industry in Georgia. Georgia’s tourism industry results in 400,000 jobs, $6 billion in resident wages and $25 billion in visitor spending. Atlanta is 3rd in the nation in relation to the number of hotel rooms occupied. The Hospitality, Recreation and Tourism Industry consists of the following five sectors: (1) Lodging, Hotels and Resorts; (2) Conventions, Meetings, Trade Shows and Events; (3) Restaurants and Food Service; (4) Recreation, Attractions, Sporting Events and Parks and (5) Travel, including Air, Rail, Auto and Coach. Hospitality management jobs include executive positions from a variety of vertical areas within the industry (e.g., business, marketing, public relations, etc.). Other occupations in the pathway vary widely from travel agents in tourism, to gaming managers in recreation, to financial supervisors in lodging. Since the industry is primarily a service‐oriented industry, workers will need good communication skills including both active listening and speaking skills, critical thinking and decision‐making skills, and they will have to understand the importance of meeting the needs of individuals.
     
    • Course 1: Marketing Principles This course addresses all the ways in which marketing satisfies consumer and business needs and wants for products and services. Students develop a basic understanding of Employability, Foundational and Business Administration skills, Economics, Entrepreneurship, Financial Analysis, Human Resources Management, Information Management, Marketing, Operations, Professional Development, Strategic Management, and Global Marketing strategies. Instructional projects with real businesses, work-based learning activities including School-Based Enterprises, and DECA application experiences should be incorporated in this course. Prerequisite: None
    • Course 2: Hospitality, Recreation and Tourism Essentials  The second course in the Hospitality, Recreation and Tourism Pathway educates students on the basics of marketing and business in relation to the hospitality, recreation, and tourism industry in the U.S. and abroad. Students will study destination geography, world economies, and historical timelines related to major segments of the hospitality industry. Students will determine how the lodging industry uses marketing to achieve goals. The vital roles of group, convention and meeting planning, human relations, communications and ethics will be discussed along with the recreation industry segment. Prerequisite: Marketing Principles
    • Course 3: Hospitality, Recreation and Tourism Management The third course in the Hospitality, Recreation and Tourism (HRT) Pathway will ensure that students develop a leadership perspective about social, environmental, economic and consumer factors impacting the HRT industry. Students will analyze operations, control systems, management structures, service levels, cost effective operations and related technology. Students will demonstrate skills in handling legal and liability issues and human resources functions. Throughout the course, students will develop an innate understanding that exemplary customer service skills define success in the industry.  Prerequisite: Fashion, Merchandising, and Retailing Essentials
    • Internship Forsyth (Work-Based Learning) Hospitality, Recreation, & Tourism: Work-Based Learning placements represent the pinnacle of the Career-Related Education experience. To qualify for a WBL placement, a student must be at least 16 years old. Students must also have a defined Career Pathway in order to participate in a Work-Based Learning placement. This is especially important for successful completion of a student’s pathway in that their job placement is directly related to the curriculum of the pathway classes they have completed or in which they are concurrently enrolled.
    fn
     
    Food and Nutrition Pathway (C, L, N, W):  Students will acquire knowledge about food choices for optimal health for a lifetime, earn fourth science credits, and discuss the basic chemistry concepts of food science and evaluate the effects of processing, preparation, and storage on the quality, safety, wholesomeness, and nutritive value of foods.
     
    • Course 1: Food, Nutrition & Wellness Food, Nutrition and Wellness is the foundational course in the nutrition and food science pathway. The focus of the course is centered on healthy food and lifestyle choices. Students will investigate the interrelationship of food, nutrition and wellness to promote good health. Prerequisite: None 
    • Course 2: Food for Life Food for Life is an advanced course in food and nutrition that addresses the variation in nutritional needs at specific stages of the human life cycle: lactation, infancy, childhood, adolescence, and adulthood including elderly. The most common nutritional concerns, their relationship to food choices and health status and strategies to enhance well-being at each stage of the lifecycle are emphasized. This course provides knowledge for real life and offers students a pathway into dietetics, consumer foods, and nutrition science careers with additional education at the post-secondary level. Prerequisite: Food, Nutrition, & Wellness
    • Course 3: Food Science Food science integrates many branches of science and relies on the application of the rapid advances in technology to expand and improve the food supply. Students will evaluate the effects of processing, preparation, and storage on the quality, safety, wholesomeness, and nutritive value of foods. Building on information learned in Nutrition and Wellness and Chemistry, this course illustrates scientific principles in an applied context, exposing students to the wonders of the scientific world. Related careers will be explored. Prerequisite: Food for Life
    • Internship Forsyth (Work-Based Learning) Human Services: Work-Based Learning placements represent the pinnacle of the Career-Related Education experience. To qualify for a WBL placement, a student must be at least 16 years old. Students must also have a defined Career Pathway in order to participate in a Work-Based Learning placement. This is especially important for successful completion of a student’s pathway in that their job placement is directly related to the curriculum of the pathway classes they have completed or in which they are concurrently enrolled.
    cosm
     
    Cosmetology Pathway (C, W): Students will master state rules and regulations, professional image, bacteriology, chemistry fundamentals, safety, and anatomy and physiology. Introductory competencies in the fundamental theory related to diseases and disorders of skin and hair will be covered; as well as, skills required for hair cutting, permanent waving and relaxing, and basic hair and scalp treatments.
     
     
    In addition, students may choose to enroll in the CLP (License Program) at the beginning of their 9th grade year. A fourth year of Cosmetology is required including several internships while they are enrolled in the program. The CLP allows the opportunity for students to receive the (1500) credit hours necessary to take their board exam after graduation. *A student must be 18 years or older to take the state board examination. 
    • Course 1: Introduction to Personal Care Services (300 credit hours*) This course introduces both fundamental theory and practices of the personal care professions including nail technicians, estheticians, barbers, and cosmetologists. Emphasis will be placed on professional practices and safety. Areas addressed in this course include: state rules and regulations, professional image, bacteriology, decontamination and infection control, chemistry fundamentals, safety, Hazardous Duty Standards Act compliance, and anatomy and physiology. Students will experience basic hands on skills in each area to help them determine the pathway they are most interested in pursuing. By completing courses in the personal care services pathways, students can potentially earn credit toward the hours required by the Georgia State Board of Barbering and/or Cosmetology or hours toward their license as an esthetician or nail technician. Pre-requisite for this course is advisor approval. *Credit hours will vary with each individual. Prerequisite: None
    • Course 2: Cosmetology Services II (300 credit hours*) After exploring the different areas of Personal Care Services in the introduction course, students may choose to pursue further training in cosmetology services. This course as well as additional advanced cosmetology courses is aligned with the Georgia State Board of Cosmetology requirements and licensure, and with the Technical College System of Georgia. This course is designed to enhance the understanding of anatomy of the skin and hair relating to the Cosmetology Industry. Students will master shampooing, permanent waving, haircutting, basic skin care, and make-up application while maintaining safety and sanitation in the workplace set forth by OSHA standards. *Credit hours will vary with each individual. Prerequisite: Introduction of Personal Care Services
    • Course 3: Cosmetology Services III (300 credit hours*) This course will cover haircutting, hair color, and relaxers. Both theory and practical work will be implemented for students to have basic entry level skills in the field of cosmetology. Safety and infection control will be applied throughout this course. Professional work ethics, communication skills, critical thinking skills, soft skills and professional image will be utilized during this course. This course aligns to the regulations and requirements of the State Board of Cosmetology. *Credit hours will vary with each individual. Prerequisite: Cosmetology Services II
    Cosmetology IV – CLP (License Program) (300) Credit Hours *Prerequisite Cosmetology I, II and III
    This course is a two block course. It is designed to enhance competencies in nail diseases and disorders, manicures, pedicures, hairstyling, wigs, thermal curling and pressing, electricity, salon business and safety. Units will include how to recognize signs of infections, disorders and diseases and when to decline a service. Focus will be on proper procedures for nail services by using sanitation and infection control guidelines. Hairstyling will include working with wigs and the use of thermal irons. The importance of learning the basics of electricity and how to use equipment safely in the salon will be emphasized. The salon business unit will provide the opportunity to learn employability skills, marketing, selling, customer relations, business operations and owning a salon. Students will earn credit (unit) hours towards the completion of the 1500 hours required by the Georgia State Board of Cosmetology. In addition, this course offers the possibility of meeting articulation alignment with technical college standards. Mastery of these standards is accomplished through project-based learning, technical skills practice, and leadership development activities of the career and technical student organization and Skills USA.
     
    *In addition to Cosmetology IV, students who continue in the CLP will take the Advanced Cosmetology Services (300 credit hours) two block course to complete the total of 1500 credit hours required by the Georgia State Board of Cosmetology. They will then become eligible to take the theory and practical exams upon graduation.
     
    i  
     
    Computer Science Pathway (A, C, D, L, N, S, W): Students will prepare for entry-level, technical, and professional IT careers, including the design, development, implementation, and maintenance of computer systems and software, as well as knowledge of computer operating systems, programming languages, and software development required of cutting-edge technologies. 
    • Course 1: Introduction to Digital Technology The goal of this course is to provide all students with an introduction to the principles of computer science and its place in the modern world. This course should also help students to use computers effectively in their lives, thus providing a foundation for successfully integrating their own interests and careers with the resources of a technological society. In this course, high school students can acquire a fundamental understanding of the operation of computers and computer networks and create useful program implementing simple algorithms. By developing web pages that include images, sound, and text, they can acquire a working understanding of the internet, common formats for data transmission, and some insights into the design of the human-computer interface. Exposure to career possibilities and discussion of ethical issues relating to computers should also be important threads in this course. Prerequisite: None
    • Course 2: Computer Science Principles (or AP Computer Science Principles)  Engage your creativity, demonstrate and build your problem solving ability all while connecting the relevance of computer science to the society! Computer Science (CS) Principles is an intellectually rich and engaging course that is focused on building a solid understanding and foundation in computer science. This course emphasizes the content, practices, thinking and skills central to the discipline of computer science. Through both its content and pedagogy, this course aims to appeal to a broad audience. The focus of this course will fall into these computational thinking practices: connecting computing, developing computational artifacts, abstracting, analyzing problems and artifacts, communicating, and collaborating. Prerequisite: Introduction to Digital Technology
    • Course 3: AP Computer Science This course is in the Advanced Placement (AP) Program developed by the College Board. The course content follows the curriculum necessary for successful performance on the Advanced Placement Examination given by the College Board. Topics included in this course include computer systems, features of programming languages, programming methodology, fundamental data structures, and algorithms. Programs are written in various application areas, such as math, business, science, and entertainment. As different colleges have different criteria for placement and for computer science credit, we suggest that the student make inquiries at their colleges of interest to determine the score necessary for credit and for placement. Students enrolled in this course are expected to take the Advanced Placement examination in AP Computer Science A in May. Student who entered as a freshmen in the 2008-2009 school year or later may count AP Computer Science A as a core science credit. Prerequisite: Computer Science Principles or AP Computer Science Principles
    • Internship Forsyth (Work-Based Learning) Information Technology: Work-Based Learning placements represent the pinnacle of the Career-Related Education experience. To qualify for a WBL placement, a student must be at least 16 years old. Students must also have a defined Career Pathway in order to participate in a Work-Based Learning placement. This is especially important for successful completion of a student’s pathway in that their job placement is directly related to the curriculum of the pathway classes they have completed or in which they are concurrently enrolled.
    Cybersecurity (A): Students will understand and apply cybersecurity technology and practices, examine fundamental skills of internal and external threats to network security and design, enforce network level security policies, and learn how to protect industry data.
     
    Student Plan of Study Guide: In Development by the Georgia Department of Education
    • Course 1: Introduction to Digital Technology Introduction to Digital Technology is designed for high school students to understand, communicate, and adapt to a digital world as it impacts their personal life, society, and the business world. Exposure to foundational knowledge in hardware, software, programming, web design, IT support, and networks are all taught in a computer lab with hands- on activities and project-focused tasks. Students will not only understand the concepts, but apply their knowledge to situations and defend their actions/decisions/choices through the knowledge and skills acquired in this course. Employability skills are integrated into activities, tasks, and projects throughout the course standards to demonstrate the skills required by business and industry. Competencies in the co-curricular student organization, Future Business Leaders of America (FBLA), are integral components of both the employability skills standards and content standards for this course. Various forms of technologies will be highlighted to expose students to the emerging technologies impacting the digital world. Professional communication skills and practices, problem-solving, ethical and legal issues, and the impact of effective presentation skills are taught in this course as a foundational knowledge to prepare students to be college and career ready. The knowledge and skills taught in this course build upon each other to form a comprehensive introduction to digital world. Prerequisite: None
    • Course 2: Introduction to Cybersecurity The course examines how the concept of security integrates into the importance of user involvement, security training, ethics, trust, application of cybersecurity practices and devices, and best practices management. The fundamental skills cover internal and external threats to network security and design, how to enforce network level security policies, how to protect an organization’s information, and a broad range of other topics. Prerequisite: Introduction to Digital Technology
    • Course 3: Advanced Cybersecurity  The course explores the field of cybersecurity with updated content including new innovations in technology and methodologies. It builds on existing concepts introduced in Introduction to Cybersecurity and expands into malware threats, cryptography, organizational security, and wireless technologies. Prerequisite: Introduction to Cybersecurity
    • Internship Forsyth (Work-Based Learning) Information Technology: Work-Based Learning placements represent the pinnacle of the Career-Related Education experience. To qualify for a WBL placement, a student must be at least 16 years old. Students must also have a defined Career Pathway in order to participate in a Work-Based Learning placement. This is especially important for successful completion of a student’s pathway in that their job placement is directly related to the curriculum of the pathway classes they have completed or in which they are concurrently enrolled.
    Game Design Pathway (A, FV): Students will prepare for entry-level, technical, and professional IT careers, including the design, development, implementation, and maintenance of computer systems and software, as well as knowledge of computer operating systems, programming languages, and software development required of cutting-edge technologies. 
     
    Student Plan of Study Guide: In Development by the Georgia Department of Education
    • Course 1: Introduction to Digital Technology The goal of this course is to provide all students with an introduction to the principles of computer science and its place in the modern world. This course should also help students to use computers effectively in their lives, thus providing a foundation for successfully integrating their own interests and careers with the resources of a technological society. In this course, high school students can acquire a fundamental understanding of the operation of computers and computer networks and create useful program implementing simple algorithms. By developing web pages that include images, sound, and text, they can acquire a working understanding of the internet, common formats for data transmission, and some insights into the design of the human-computer interface. Exposure to career possibilities and discussion of ethical issues relating to computers should also be important threads in this course. Prerequisite: None
    • Course 2: Computer Science Principles (or AP Computer Science Principles)  Engage your creativity, demonstrate and build your problem solving ability all while connecting the relevance of computer science to the society! Computer Science (CS) Principles is an intellectually rich and engaging course that is focused on building a solid understanding and foundation in computer science. This course emphasizes the content, practices, thinking and skills central to the discipline of computer science. Through both its content and pedagogy, this course aims to appeal to a broad audience. The focus of this course will fall into these computational thinking practices: connecting computing, developing computational artifacts, abstracting, analyzing problems and artifacts, communicating, and collaborating. Prerequisite: Introduction to Digital Technology
    • Course 3: Game Design Animation and Simulation In this course, students will gain an understanding of the fundamental principles used at every stage of the game creation process. First, game genres and modes of play are explored in terms of the psychology of incentives, motivation to play, and social networking. Next, virtual characters and non-player characters are reviewed from concept drawing to 2D and 3D art, rigging, and animation. Next, level design, storytelling, and animation are added to develop a virtual world around the characters. These same techniques are at work in training simulator systems, virtual shopping experiences, augmented reality, and a number of other important career options. Schools offering this program can provide a foundation of traditional drawing, illustration, and art courses to make way for the 2D and 3D animation, storytelling, character development, audio, and game technology.
    • Internship Forsyth (Work-Based Learning) Information Technology: Work-Based Learning placements represent the pinnacle of the Career-Related Education experience. To qualify for a WBL placement, a student must be at least 16 years old. Students must also have a defined Career Pathway in order to participate in a Work-Based Learning placement. This is especially important for successful completion of a student’s pathway in that their job placement is directly related to the curriculum of the pathway classes they have completed or in which they are concurrently enrolled.
    Internet of Things (N): Students will focus on the interaction of programming and devices, using data from various sensors and sources in order to make decisions, take actions, and more. Students will show first-hand how programming and machines interact in our society.
     
    Student Plan of Study Guide: In Development by the Georgia Department of Education
    • Course 1: Introduction to Digital Technology Introduction to Digital Technology is designed for high school students to understand, communicate, and adapt to a digital world as it impacts their personal life, society, and the business world. Exposure to foundational knowledge in hardware, software, programming, web design, IT support, and networks are all taught in a computer lab with hands- on activities and project-focused tasks. Students will not only understand the concepts, but apply their knowledge to situations and defend their actions/decisions/choices through the knowledge and skills acquired in this course. Employability skills are integrated into activities, tasks, and projects throughout the course standards to demonstrate the skills required by business and industry. Competencies in the co-curricular student organization, Future Business Leaders of America (FBLA), are integral components of both the employability skills standards and content standards for this course. Various forms of technologies will be highlighted to expose students to the emerging technologies impacting the digital world. Professional communication skills and practices, problem-solving, ethical and legal issues, and the impact of effective presentation skills are taught in this course as a foundational knowledge to prepare students to be college and career ready. The knowledge and skills taught in this course build upon each other to form a comprehensive introduction to digital world. Prerequisite: None
    • Course 2: Computer Science Principles or AP Computer Science Principles Engage your creativity, demonstrate and build your problem solving ability all while connecting the relevance of computer science to the society! Computer Science (CS) Principles is an intellectually rich and engaging course that is focused on building a solid understanding and foundation in computer science. This course emphasizes the content, practices, thinking and skills central to the discipline of computer science. Through both its content and pedagogy, this course aims to appeal to a broad audience. The focus of this course will fall into these computational thinking practices: connecting computing, developing computational artifacts, abstracting, analyzing problems and artifacts, communicating, and collaborating. Prerequisite: Introduction to Digital Technology
    • Course 3: Embedded Computing This course will focus on the interaction of programming and devices, using data from various sensors and sources in order to make decisions, take actions, and more. A common industry term to describe this work is Internet of Things. Students will show first-hand how programming and machines interact to accomplish common and essential tasks throughout our society.  After mastery of the standards in this course, students should be prepared to earn an industry-recognized credential in this career area. Prerequisite: Computer Science Principles or AP Computer Science Principles
    • Internship Forsyth (Work-Based Learning) Information Technology: Work-Based Learning placements represent the pinnacle of the Career-Related Education experience. To qualify for a WBL placement, a student must be at least 16 years old. Students must also have a defined Career Pathway in order to participate in a Work-Based Learning placement. This is especially important for successful completion of a student’s pathway in that their job placement is directly related to the curriculum of the pathway classes they have completed or in which they are concurrently enrolled.
    Programming Pathway (L, S): Students will learn essential skills involved in the design, development, implementation, and maintenance of computer systems and software, requiring knowledge of computer operating systems, programming languages, and software development.
     
    • Course 1: Introduction to Digital Technology Introduction to Digital Technology is designed for high school students to understand, communicate, and adapt to a digital world as it impacts their personal life, society, and the business world. Exposure to foundational knowledge in hardware, software, programming, web design, IT support, and networks are all taught in a computer lab with hands- on activities and project-focused tasks. Students will not only understand the concepts, but apply their knowledge to situations and defend their actions/decisions/choices through the knowledge and skills acquired in this course. Employability skills are integrated into activities, tasks, and projects throughout the course standards to demonstrate the skills required by business and industry. Competencies in the co-curricular student organization, Future Business Leaders of America (FBLA), are integral components of both the employability skills standards and content standards for this course. Various forms of technologies will be highlighted to expose students to the emerging technologies impacting the digital world. Professional communication skills and practices, problem-solving, ethical and legal issues, and the impact of effective presentation skills are taught in this course as a foundational knowledge to prepare students to be college and career ready. The knowledge and skills taught in this course build upon each other to form a comprehensive introduction to digital world.  Prerequisite: None
    • Course 2: Computer Science Principles Engage your creativity, demonstrate and build your problem solving ability all while connecting the relevance of computer science to the society! Computer Science (CS) Principles is an intellectually rich and engaging course that is focused on building a solid understanding and foundation in computer science. This course emphasizes the content, practices, thinking and skills central to the discipline of computer science. Through both its content and pedagogy, this course aims to appeal to a broad audience. The focus of this course will fall into these computational thinking practices: connecting computing, developing computational artifacts, abstracting, analyzing problems and artifacts, communicating, and collaborating. Prerequisite: Introduction to Digital Technology
    • Course 3: Programming, Games, Apps, & Society The course is designed for high school students to strategize, design, and develop games and mobile and desktop applications that can be produced in the real world. Students will learn about life-cycles of project development and use models to develop applications. Attention will be placed on how user interfaces affect the usability and effectiveness of a game or an application. Programming constructs will be employed which will allow students’ applications to interact with “real world,” stimuli. The course exposes students to privacy, legality, and security considerations with regards to the software industry.  Prerequisite: Computer Science Principles
    • Internship Forsyth (Work-Based Learning) Information Technology: Work-Based Learning placements represent the pinnacle of the Career-Related Education experience. To qualify for a WBL placement, a student must be at least 16 years old. Students must also have a defined Career Pathway in order to participate in a Work-Based Learning placement. This is especially important for successful completion of a student’s pathway in that their job placement is directly related to the curriculum of the pathway classes they have completed or in which they are concurrently enrolled.
    Web Development Pathway (D, L, W): Students will learn and apply foundational knowledge of "front-end" and "back-end" development to address the presentation and data access layers of web site development. Students will apply HTML and CSS coding at its foundational level as well.
     
    Student Plan of Study Guide: In Development by the Georgia Department of Education
    • Course 1: Introduction to Digital Technology Introduction to Digital Technology is designed for high school students to understand, communicate, and adapt to a digital world as it impacts their personal life, society, and the business world. Exposure to foundational knowledge in hardware, software, programming, web design, IT support, and networks are all taught in a computer lab with hands- on activities and project-focused tasks. Students will not only understand the concepts, but apply their knowledge to situations and defend their actions/decisions/choices through the knowledge and skills acquired in this course. Employability skills are integrated into activities, tasks, and projects throughout the course standards to demonstrate the skills required by business and industry. Competencies in the co-curricular student organization, Future Business Leaders of America (FBLA), are integral components of both the employability skills standards and content standards for this course. Various forms of technologies will be highlighted to expose students to the emerging technologies impacting the digital world. Professional communication skills and practices, problem-solving, ethical and legal issues, and the impact of effective presentation skills are taught in this course as a foundational knowledge to prepare students to be college and career ready. The knowledge and skills taught in this course build upon each other to form a comprehensive introduction to digital world. Prerequisite: None
    • Course 2: Computer Science Principles Engage your creativity, demonstrate and build your problem solving ability all while connecting the relevance of computer science to the society! Computer Science (CS) Principles is an intellectually rich and engaging course that is focused on building a solid understanding and foundation in computer science. This course emphasizes the content, practices, thinking and skills central to the discipline of computer science. Through both its content and pedagogy, this course aims to appeal to a broad audience. The focus of this course will fall into these computational thinking practices: connecting computing, developing computational artifacts, abstracting, analyzing problems and artifacts, communicating, and collaborating. Prerequisite: Introduction to Digital Technology
    • Course 3: Web Development This course, with Hypertext Markup Language (HTML) and Cascading Style Sheet (CSS) as its foundation, will teach students to develop and design responsive web sites through coding, testing, debugging and implementation of web-based services. This course will also allow students to learn about content management systems, client side languages, server side languages, and database concepts. The course is designed to give students foundational knowledge of "front-end" and "back-end" development to address the presentation and data access layers of web site development. Web Development is the third course in the Web Development pathway. Students enrolled in this course should have successfully completed Introduction to Digital Technology and Computer Science Principles. After mastery of the standards in this course, students should be prepared to earn an industry-recognized credential in this career area. Prerequisite: Computer Science Principles
    • Internship Forsyth (Work-Based Learning) Information Technology: Work-Based Learning placements represent the pinnacle of the Career-Related Education experience. To qualify for a WBL placement, a student must be at least 16 years old. Students must also have a defined Career Pathway in order to participate in a Work-Based Learning placement. This is especially important for successful completion of a student’s pathway in that their job placement is directly related to the curriculum of the pathway classes they have completed or in which they are concurrently enrolled.

    law

    Firefighting Pathway (A): Law, Public Safety, Corrections and Security workers plan, manage and provide legal, public safety, protection services and homeland security including professional and technical support services. Occupations are numerous and represent multiple levels of education and skills. Occupations fall into major categories based on common knowledge and skills: correction services such as, public safety communications, correctional officers and jailers; public safety communications, law enforcement, and emergency and fire management services such as fire fighters, EMTs, and paramedics; security and protective services such as information security IT specialists; law enforcement such as criminal investigators, police officers, special agents; and legal services such as a court reporters or lawyers.
     
    • Course 1: Introduction to Law, Public Safety, Corrections, and Security Introduction to Law, Public Safety, Corrections, and Security (LPSCS) is the pre-requisite for all other courses within the Career Cluster. This course provides students with career-focused educational opportunities in various LPSCS fields. It examines the basic concepts of law related to citizens’ rights and the responsibilities, and students will receive instruction in critical skill areas including: communicating with diverse groups, conflict resolution, ethics, CERT (Citizens Emergency Response Training, or similar program), basic firefighting, report writing, terrorism, civil and criminal law. Prerequisite: None
    • Course 2: Essentials of Fire and Emergency Services This course addresses the essential components needed for fire and emergency services. Students will be prepared for their third-course options that include the following: firefighting, emergency medical responder, and public safety communications. Students will explore career options, interagency communications, medical services, and basic firefighting standards.  Prerequisite: Introduction to Law, Public Safety, Corrections, and Security
    • Course 3: Applications of Firefighting This course, along with the prerequisite courses, is designed to meet the requirements of NFPA® 1001, Fire Fighter I. After completing this course, the student will be able to sit for the exam to certify as a Firefighter I per National Fire Protection Association (NFPA®) 1001, Standard for Fire Fighter Professional Qualifications. This course is also based on the Basic Firefighting Training Program from the GA Public Safety Training Center (GPSTC). GPSTC has teacher-trainer resources (including skill sheets for those that are required) and recommended text.

       Prerequisite: Essentials of Fire and Emergency Services

    • Internship Forsyth (Work-Based Learning) Law, Public Safety, Corrections, and Security: Work-Based Learning placements represent the pinnacle of the Career-Related Education experience. To qualify for a WBL placement, a student must be at least 16 years old. Students must also have a defined Career Pathway in order to participate in a Work-Based Learning placement. This is especially important for successful completion of a student’s pathway in that their job placement is directly related to the curriculum of the pathway classes they have completed or in which they are concurrently enrolled.

    Law Enforcement Services/Criminal Investigations (A): Law, Public Safety, Corrections and Security workers plan, manage and provide legal, public safety, protection services and homeland security including professional and technical support services. Occupations are numerous and represent multiple levels of education and skills. Occupations fall into major categories based on common knowledge and skills: correction services such as, public safety communications, correctional officers and jailers; public safety communications, law enforcement, and emergency and fire management services such as fire fighters, EMTs, and paramedics; security and protective services such as information security IT specialists; law enforcement such as criminal investigators, police officers, special agents; and legal services such as a court reporters or lawyers.
     
    • Course 1: Introduction to Law, Public Safety, Corrections, and Security This course is the pre-requisite for all other courses within the Career Cluster. This course provides students with career-focused educational opportunities in various LPSCS fields. It examines the basic concepts of law related to citizens’ rights and the responsibilities, and students will receive instruction in critical skill areas including: communicating with diverse groups, conflict resolution, ethics, CERT (Citizens Emergency Response Training, or similar program), basic firefighting, report writing, terrorism, civil and criminal law. Prerequisite: None
    • Course 2: Criminal Justice Essentials This course provides an overview of the criminal justice system. Starting with historical perspectives of the origin of the system, the course reviews the overall structure. Students will become immersed in criminal and constitutional law and will review basic law enforcement skills. The course ends with a mock trial to provide participants with a first-hand experience of the criminal justice system.  Prerequisite: Introduction to Law, Public Safety, Corrections, and Security
    • Course 3: Criminal Investigations This course is designed to provide students with an opportunity to explore the basic processes and principles of a criminal investigation. Students will learn the legal responsibilities and challenges of the patrol officer, investigator, and crime scene technician at a crime scene. Students will learn the importance of preserving and documenting the crime scene along with the identification, collection, and processing of evidence and the contribution to the criminal investigation.  

       Prerequisite: Criminal Justice Essentials

    • Internship Forsyth (Work-Based Learning) Law, Public Safety, Corrections, and Security: Work-Based Learning placements represent the pinnacle of the Career-Related Education experience. To qualify for a WBL placement, a student must be at least 16 years old. Students must also have a defined Career Pathway in order to participate in a Work-Based Learning placement. This is especially important for successful completion of a student’s pathway in that their job placement is directly related to the curriculum of the pathway classes they have completed or in which they are concurrently enrolled.

    Law Enforcement Services/Applications of Law (A): Law, Public Safety, Corrections and Security workers plan, manage and provide legal, public safety, protection services and homeland security including professional and technical support services. Occupations are numerous and represent multiple levels of education and skills. Occupations fall into major categories based on common knowledge and skills: correction services such as, public safety communications, correctional officers and jailers; public safety communications, law enforcement, and emergency and fire management services such as fire fighters, EMTs, and paramedics; security and protective services such as information security IT specialists; law enforcement such as criminal investigators, police officers, special agents; and legal services such as a court reporters or lawyers.
     
    • Course 1: Introduction to Law, Public Safety, Corrections, and Security This course is the pre-requisite for all other courses within the Career Cluster. This course provides students with career-focused educational opportunities in various LPSCS fields. It examines the basic concepts of law related to citizens’ rights and the responsibilities, and students will receive instruction in critical skill areas including: communicating with diverse groups, conflict resolution, ethics, CERT (Citizens Emergency Response Training, or similar program), basic firefighting, report writing, terrorism, civil and criminal law. Prerequisite: None
    • Course 2: Essentials of Legal Services This course provides an overview of the judicial process and role in our constitutional system of government. The major focus of the course is on constitutional rights of citizens and the corresponding duties of governmental officials. Students will learn about the role of the United States Supreme Court as the final arbiter of constitutional rights and responsibilities, as well as learning about the legal process in both criminal and civil cases. Students will learn about the various participants and the legal and ethical roles in criminal and civil cases. Students will not only understand these legal concepts, but will be able to apply their knowledge to various scenarios and defend their choices, decisions, and actions. Employability skills will be integrated into the tasks, activities, and projects to demonstrate skills required in legal services careers.   Prerequisite: Introduction to Law, Public Safety, Corrections, and Security
    • Course 3: Applications of Law This course focuses on substantive law, both criminal and civil law, as well as the application of the law to factual scenarios. Students will learn the basic concepts of criminal law in order to analyze factual scenarios and apply criminal law to justify an appropriate criminal charge and the presence of possible defenses. Students will also learn basic civil law, including, torts, contracts, real property, family law, and immigration law. Students will not only understand the foundations of civil law, but will learn to use the IRAC (Issue, Rule, Analysis, and Conclusion) method of legal analysis and making cogent and persuasive legal arguments. Students will develop critical-thinking skills necessary to apply the law to various factual situations and to defend choices, decisions, and actions. Employability skills will be integrated into the tasks, activities, and projects to demonstrate skills required in legal services careers. 

      Prerequisite: Essentials of Legal Services

    • Internship Forsyth (Work-Based Learning) Law, Public Safety, Corrections, and Security: Work-Based Learning placements represent the pinnacle of the Career-Related Education experience. To qualify for a WBL placement, a student must be at least 16 years old. Students must also have a defined Career Pathway in order to participate in a Work-Based Learning placement. This is especially important for successful completion of a student’s pathway in that their job placement is directly related to the curriculum of the pathway classes they have completed or in which they are concurrently enrolled.

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    Manufacturing Pathway (D, S): Students will familiarize themselves with related careers and develop fundamental technological literacy as they learn about the history, systems, and processes of manufacturing; apply their knowledge of computer aided design (CAD), computer numerical control (CNC), robots, computer assisted manufacturing (CAM), programmable logic controllers (PLC), automated guided vehicles (AGV), and computer integrated manufacturing (CIM); and learn how businesses engage in the production of products beginning with pre-production activities and continuing through post-production activities.
     
    • Course 1: Foundations of Manufacturing and Materials Science Foundations of Manufacturing and Materials Science is the introductory course for the Manufacturing career pathway. This course provides students with opportunities to become familiar with related careers and develop fundamental technological literacy as they learn about the history, systems, and processes of manufacturing. In addition, the course will provide an overview of the safe use of tools and equipment used in the industry.  Prerequisite: None
    • Course 2: Robotics and Automated Systems Upon completing this course, students will be able to apply their knowledge of computer aided design (CAD), computer numerical control (CNC), robotics, computer assisted manufacturing (CAM), programmable logic controllers, automated guided vehicles (AGV), and computer integrated manufacturing (CIM). Prerequisite: Foundations of Manufacturing and Materials Science
    • Course 3: Production Enterprises The purpose of this course is to give students on understanding of how to design and implement a production system. Students learn how businesses engage in the production of products beginning with pre-production activities and continuing through post-production activities. Additionally, students will learn about the historical and societal impact of production. Students will also develop an understanding of careers available in manufacturing and the skills and education required for those careers. Prerequisite: Robotics and Automated Systems
    • Internship Forsyth (Work-Based Learning) Manufacturing: Work-Based Learning placements represent the pinnacle of the Career-Related Education experience. To qualify for a WBL placement, a student must be at least 16 years old. Students must also have a defined Career Pathway in order to participate in a Work-Based Learning placement. This is especially important for successful completion of a student’s pathway in that their job placement is directly related to the curriculum of the pathway classes they have completed or in which they are concurrently enrolled.

    Mechatronics Pathway (A): Mechatronics is a diverse field. It encompasses many inter‐related disciplines including Electronics, Mechanics, Fluid Power, Electrical Control Systems, Programmable Logic Controllers (PLC), Computers, and Robotics. Mechatronics is a term which includes the above disciplines and takes an integrated approach to their study. People employed in the mechatronics field deal with automated systems in a wide variety of applications. They also deal with related professional and technical support activities such as production planning and control, maintenance, and engineering.

    • Course 1: Introduction to Mechatronics - DC Theory, Pneumatic Systems, and Programmable Logic Controllers This course introduces students to direct current concepts and applications, pneumatic system fundamentals, and programmable logic controllers (PLCs). Topics include, but are not limited to, electrical laws and principles, magnetism, series, parallel, and simple combination DC circuits, pneumatic system principles and components, and PLC installation and programming. Theory and practical application concepts are discussed and illustrated through labs.  Prerequisite: None
    • Course 2: AC Theory, Electric Motors, and Hydraulic Systems This course further expands the student’s knowledge and understanding of Mechatronics through introducing students to: alternating current theory and applications of varying sine wave voltages and current, inductance and capacitance, motor theory and operating principles, control devices, symbols and schematic diagrams, preventative maintenance and troubleshooting, and hydraulic system principles and components. Theory and practical application concepts are discussed and illustrated through labs. Prerequisite: Introduction to Mechatronics
    • Course 3: Semiconductors, Mechanical Systems, and Pump and Piping Systems By completing this course, students will be introduced to electronics theory, mechanical systems, and pump and piping systems. Topics include, but are not limited to, diodes and amplifiers, semiconductor fundamentals, mechanical drives, measurement processes and techniques, maintenance tools, manufacturing processes, bearing design and application, and pump and piping systems. Theory and practical application concepts are discussed and illustrated through labs. Prerequisite: AC Theory, Electric Motors, and Hyraulic Systems
    • Internship Forsyth (Work-Based Learning) Manufacturing: Work-Based Learning placements represent the pinnacle of the Career-Related Education experience. To qualify for a WBL placement, a student must be at least 16 years old. Students must also have a defined Career Pathway in order to participate in a Work-Based Learning placement. This is especially important for successful completion of a student’s pathway in that their job placement is directly related to the curriculum of the pathway classes they have completed or in which they are concurrently enrolled.
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    Fashion Marketing (D, L, S, W):  Students will learn how designers, manufacturers, merchandisers, and retailers collaborate to market and sell thousands of products. Students will focus on managing processes related to visual merchandising, buying, researching, advertising, promoting, and selling products globally.
     
    • Course 1: Marketing Principles This course addresses all the ways in which marketing satisfies consumer and business needs and wants for products and services. Students develop a basic understanding of Employability, Foundational and Business Administration skills, Economics, Entrepreneurship, Financial Analysis, Human Resources Management, Information Management, Marketing, Operations, Professional Development, Strategic Management, and Global Marketing strategies. Instructional projects with real businesses, work-based learning activities including School-Based Enterprises, and DECA application experiences should be incorporated in this course. Prerequisite: None
    • Course 2: Fashion, Merchandising and Retailing Essentials  This course introduces students to the retail industry including the fundamentals of fashion marketing, key marketing concepts essential to every business, types of businesses involved in the industry, and an array of career opportunities. Students will develop skills in such areas as fashion economics, marketing segmentation and target marketing, product selection and buying, and inventory systems. Prerequisite: Marketing Principles
    • Course 3: Advanced Fashion, Merchandising and Retailing Advanced Fashion, Merchandising and Retailing is the third course in the Fashion, Merchandising and Retail Management Career Pathway and focuses on the application of knowledge and the performance of key skills required in a retail environment. Students will develop skills necessary for managing the following elements: pricing, visual merchandising, advertising, special promotions, professional sales, and customer service. Prerequisite: Fashion, Merchandising, and Retailing Essentials
    • Internship Forsyth (Work-Based Learning) Marketing: Work-Based Learning placements represent the pinnacle of the Career-Related Education experience. To qualify for a WBL placement, a student must be at least 16 years old. Students must also have a defined Career Pathway in order to participate in a Work-Based Learning placement. This is especially important for successful completion of a student’s pathway in that their job placement is directly related to the curriculum of the pathway classes they have completed or in which they are concurrently enrolled.
    Marketing Management Pathway (C, D, L, N, S, W): Students will focus on managing the processes responsible for identifying, anticipating, and satisfying customer requirements in a manner that is profitable for the business. Student skills include management and entrepreneurship, marketing, buying and merchandising, marketing communications and promotion, professional sales, marketing information management and research, channel management, global marketing, and internet/online marketing.
     
    • Course 1: Marketing Principles This course addresses all the ways in which marketing satisfies consumer and business needs and wants for products and services. Students develop a basic understanding of Employability, Foundational and Business Administration skills, Economics, Entrepreneurship, Financial Analysis, Human Resources Management, Information Management, Marketing, Operations, Professional Development, Strategic Management, and Global Marketing strategies. Instructional projects with real businesses, work-based learning activities including School-Based Enterprises, and DECA application experiences should be incorporated in this course. Prerequisite: None
    • Course 2: Marketing and Entrepreneurship This course is the second course in the Marketing and Management Career Pathway. Marketing and Entrepreneurship begins an in-depth and detailed study of marketing while also focusing on management with specific emphasis on small business ownership. This course builds on the theories learned in Marketing Principles by providing practical application scenarios which test these theories. In addition, Marketing and Entrepreneurship focuses on the role of the supervisor and examines the qualities needed to be successful. Prerequisite: Marketing Principles
    • Course 3: Marketing Management This course is the third course in the Marketing and Management pathway. Students assume a managerial perspective by applying economic principles in marketing, analyzing operation’s needs, examining channel management and financial alternatives, managing marketing information, pricing products and services, developing product/service planning strategies, promoting products and services, purchasing, and professional sales. This course also includes global marketing where students analyze marketing strategies employed in the United States versus those employed in other countries. Prerequisite: Marketing and Entrepreneurship
    • Internship Forsyth (Work-Based Learning) Marketing: Work-Based Learning placements represent the pinnacle of the Career-Related Education experience. To qualify for a WBL placement, a student must be at least 16 years old. Students must also have a defined Career Pathway in order to participate in a Work-Based Learning placement. This is especially important for successful completion of a student’s pathway in that their job placement is directly related to the curriculum of the pathway classes they have completed or in which they are concurrently enrolled. 
    Sports and Entertainment Marketing Pathway (C, D, L, N, S, W): Students will apply knowledge and skills in all areas of marketing to promote brands by using sports and entertainment celebrities and events to connect with broad or individual targeted groups of consumers.
     
    • Course 1: Marketing Principles This course addresses all the ways in which marketing satisfies consumer and business needs and wants for products and services. Students develop a basic understanding of Employability, Foundational and Business Administration skills, Economics, Entrepreneurship, Financial Analysis, Human Resources Management, Information Management, Marketing, Operations, Professional Development, Strategic Management, and Global Marketing strategies. Instructional projects with real businesses, work-based learning activities including School-Based Enterprises, and DECA application experiences should be incorporated in this course. Prerequisite: None
    • Course 2: Introduction to Sports and Entertainment Marketing This course introduces the student to the major segments of the Sports and Entertainment Industry and the social and economic impact the industry has on the local, state, national, and global economies. The products and services offered to consumers and the impact of marketing on these products and services are examined. Units include: Business Fundamentals, Product Mix, Product Knowledge, Product/Service Management, Business Regulations, Interpersonal Skill, Selling, Marketing Information Management, Economics, Distribution, Pricing, Advertising, Publicity/Public Relations, Sales Promotion, Business Risks, and Organization. Prerequisite: Marketing Principles
    • Course 3: Advanced Sports and Entertainment Marketing This course provides students opportunities to develop managerial and analytical skills and deepen their knowledge in sports/entertainment marketing. Topical units include: Marketing-Information Management, Selling, Publicity/Public Relations, Sales Promotion, Management of Promotion, Product Mix, Pricing, Positioning, and Marketing Planning. Prerequisite: Introduction to Sports and Entertainment Marketing
    • Internship Forsyth (Work-Based Learning) Marketing: Work-Based Learning placements represent the pinnacle of the Career-Related Education experience. To qualify for a WBL placement, a student must be at least 16 years old. Students must also have a defined Career Pathway in order to participate in a Work-Based Learning placement. This is especially important for successful completion of a student’s pathway in that their job placement is directly related to the curriculum of the pathway classes they have completed or in which they are concurrently enrolled. 
       
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    Engineering and Technology Pathway (C, D, L, N, S, W): Students will combine hands-on projects and rigorous curriculum to be prepared for challenging postsecondary engineering and technology problems; and build solid technical writing, comprehension, calculation, problem-solving, and technical skills. Students are encouraged to take relevant math and science courses, such as advanced algebra, chemistry, calculus, geometry, trigonometry, physics, design, and engineering concepts.
     
    • Course 1: Foundations of Engineering and Technology The Foundations of Engineering and Technology is the introductory course for the Engineering and Technology Education pathways. This STEM driven course provides the students with an overview of engineering and technology including the different methods used in the engineering design process developing fundamental technology and engineering literacy. Students will demonstrate the skills and knowledge they have learned through various project based activities while using an engineering design process to successfully master the “E” in STEM. Prerequisite: None
    • Course 2: Engineering Concepts Engineering Concepts is the second course in the engineering pathway. This course introduces students to the fundamental principles of engineering. Students learn about areas of specialization within engineering and engineering design, and apply engineering tools and procedures as they complete hands-on instructional activities. Prerequisite: Foundations of Engineering and Technology
    • Course 3: Engineering Applications Engineering Applications is the third course in the engineering pathway. Students have opportunities to apply engineering design as they develop a solution for a technological problem. Students use applications of mathematics and science to predict the success of an engineered solution and complete hands-on activities with tools, materials, and processes as they develop working drawings and prototypes. Prerequisite: Engineering Concepts
    • Research, Design and Project Management (Engineering) Research, Design, and Project Management is the fourth course in the engineering pathway. This course provides students with opportunities to work with students from other pathways as a member of a design team. Research strategies, prototype testing and evaluation, and communication skills are emphasized. Prerequisite: Engineering Applications
    • Internship Forsyth (Work-Based Learning) Engineering: Work-Based Learning placements represent the pinnacle of the Career-Related Education experience. To qualify for a WBL placement, a student must be at least 16 years old. Students must also have a defined Career Pathway in order to participate in a Work-Based Learning placement. This is especially important for successful completion of a student’s pathway in that their job placement is directly related to the curriculum of the pathway classes they have completed or in which they are concurrently enrolled.

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    Aerospace/Flight Operations Pathway (A): Students will focus on learning all aspects of aerospace and aviation. Those employed in flight operations include aircraft pilots, flight engineers, flight attendants and air traffic controllers. The earnings of airline pilots are among the highest in the nation. Competition for jobs is expected to be strong through 2015. Job opportunities are expected to be best with regional and low‐fare airlines. Many pilots usually start with smaller commuter and regional airlines to gain experience to qualify for higher paying jobs with national or major airlines. Commercial pilots have a faster than average growth pattern while other areas of employment remain steady or slow. All pilots who transport passengers or cargo must have a commercial pilot’s license with an instrument rating issued by the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA). 
     
    • Course 1: Fundamentals of Aerospace This course is designed as the foundational course for both the Aviation Maintenance and the Flight Operations pathways. Students will gain a fundamental knowledge base in aviation history and regulations, the basic principles of flight, aerospace careers, and factors influencing work systems, aerospace technologies, and basic aviation meteorology. These concepts can later be applied to various aerospace occupations. Classroom and lab activities will assure students a thorough understanding of the aerospace environment. Prerequisite: None
    • Course 2: Flight Operations I Navigation and Communication are essential to the safe operation of aircraft within the airspace system. This course provides a foundation that enables the student to apply the basics of aircraft navigation and utilize efficient communication methods for safe aircraft operations. Prerequisite: Fundamentals of Aerospace
    • Course 3: Flight Operations II Atmospheric dynamics and concepts are addressed to build a meteorological foundation that will enable students to understand environmental variables that create and change the earth’s weather. Meteorological techniques will be used in analyzing, charting, and forecasting weather patterns, and students will apply learned skills to the aeronautical needs and procedures of the air transportation industry. Prerequisite: Flight Operations I
    • Internship Forsyth (Work-Based Learning) Transportation, Distribution, and Logistics: Work-Based Learning placements represent the pinnacle of the Career-Related Education experience. To qualify for a WBL placement, a student must be at least 16 years old. Students must also have a defined Career Pathway in order to participate in a Work-Based Learning placement. This is especially important for successful completion of a student’s pathway in that their job placement is directly related to the curriculum of the pathway classes they have completed or in which they are concurrently enrolled. 
    Aerospace/Aviation Maintenance Pathway (A): Students will focus on learning all aspects of aerospace and aviation. Aviation maintenance jobs include aircraft and avionics equipment mechanics and service technicians. People employed in aviation maintenance perform scheduled maintenance, make repairs and complete inspections required by the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA). Some mechanics work on one or many different types of aircraft, while others specialize in one section of a particular type of aircraft, such as the engine, hydraulics or the electrical system.
     
    • Course 1: Fundamentals of Aerospace This course is designed as the foundational course for both the Aviation Maintenance and the Flight Operations pathways. Students will gain a fundamental knowledge base in aviation history and regulations, the basic principles of flight, aerospace careers, and factors influencing work systems, aerospace technologies, and basic aviation meteorology. These concepts can later be applied to various aerospace occupations. Classroom and lab activities will assure students a thorough understanding of the aerospace environment. Prerequisite: None
    • Course 2: Aviation Maintenance I Students will build a solid knowledge base in the basics of aircraft maintenance, performance, and design. Classroom and laboratory activities assure a thorough understanding of the aviation environment. Prerequisite: Fundamentals of Aerospace
    • Course 3: Aviation Maintenance II Students continue to build and expand their solid knowledge base in the basics of aircraft maintenance, performance, and design. Classroom and laboratory activities assure a thorough understanding of the aviation environment. Prerequisite: Aviation Maintenance II
    • Internship Forsyth (Work-Based Learning) Transportation, Distribution, and Logistics: Work-Based Learning placements represent the pinnacle of the Career-Related Education experience. To qualify for a WBL placement, a student must be at least 16 years old. Students must also have a defined Career Pathway in order to participate in a Work-Based Learning placement. This is especially important for successful completion of a student’s pathway in that their job placement is directly related to the curriculum of the pathway classes they have completed or in which they are concurrently enrolled. 
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    General Automotive Service Technology Pathway(C) and Advanced Automotive Service Technology(C): This program is a 4-year Master Accredited Automotive Training Program with recognition of Applied Academics in Language Arts, Science and Mathematics. The program offers over 1600 hours of available training including over 1200 hours of lab and hands on activities and over 400 hours of additional practical application available through three levels of internship classes. The program is single period single credit for the first two years and then is a double period double credit program for years three and four. Students will demonstrate an understanding of the components within automobile sub-systems, as well as, the advanced tasks related to automobile service. This pathway culminates with the students taking the end of pathway assessments for ASE Entry Level Certification (www.asestudentcertification.com) offered by the National Institute for Automotive Service Excellence (ASE) in collaboration with the ASE Education Foundation in Maintenance and Light Repair, Automotive Service Technology, Engine Repair, Automatic Transmission, Manual Transmission and Axles, Suspension and Steering, Brakes, Electrical, Heating and Air Conditioning, and Engine Performance.  Articulation credit is available through some Georgia Technical College System Schools. Dual Enrollment is also possible. Upon successful completion of this program, students will receive a training certificate diploma and be given opportunity to take the ASE Professional Certification Tests at their own expense. Students who pass these exams will become Professionally Certified by ASE upon completion of the 1 to 2-year experience requirement. Students who compete this program are also given one year of experience towards that requirement. Students can also apply for paid internships through the ASE Automotive Education Foundation www.aseeducationfoundation.org for full or part time internships at local dealerships or repair facilities.
     

    The Career Technical Student Organization (CTSO) for this program is SkillsUSA. Students receive leadership and organizational training through SkillsUSA and are eligible to compete in Automotive Technology Competitions at region, state, and national levels. Automotive Technology students at Forsyth Central HS are also eligible to compete in the National Engine Team Building Challenge, Electrathon Vehicle Building and Racing, and the National Automotive Technology Competition in New York each year. Note: Schedules and avaiability of competitive events travel are contingent on system policies and budget on an annual basis. 

    The following courses include the basic skills needed to gain employment as an entry level automotive technician. Students will be given instruction and hands on practice in employability skills, workplace skills, job search and interviewing skills, shop management and customer service skills, phone etiquette, parts acquisition, shop housekeeping, proper employee to employee relations, shop safety, pollution prevention, EPA and OSHA guidelines, automotive preventative maintenance, brakes, steering and suspension, electrical systems, engine repair, engine performance, automatic transmission, manual transmission/differential and automotive heating ventilation and air conditioning. The hours completed in these courses are aligned with ASE standards and are a base for the certified entry-level technician. https://www.gadoe.org/Curriculum-Instruction-and-Assessment/CTAE/Pages/cluster-TDL.aspx

    • Automotive Technologies 1 This course is designed as the foundational course for the General Automotive Technology pathway. Students in this course will learn the basic skills needed to gain employment as an entry level automotive technician. Students will be exposed to courses in automotive preventative maintenance, brakes, steering and suspension, electrical systems, engine repair, engine performance, automatic transmission, manual transmission and differential & automotive HVAC. The hours completed in this course are aligned with ASE standards and are a base for the entry-level technician.  Prerequisite: Successful completion of middle school math, science, and language arts classes.
    • Automotive Technologies 2 This course is designed as the second course for the General Automotive Technology Pathway. Students in this course will learn the basic skills needed to gain employment as an entry level automotive technician. Students will be exposed to courses in automotive preventative maintenance, brakes, steering and suspension, electrical systems, engine repair, engine performance, automatic transmission, manual transmission and differential & automotive HVAC. The hours completed in this course are aligned with ASE standards and are a base for the entry-level technician. Prerequisite: Automotive Technologies 1 and Instructor Approval
    • Automotive Technologies 3 This course is designed as the third course for the General Automotive Technology Pathway. Students in this course will learn the basic skills needed to gain employment as an entry level automotive technician. Students will be exposed to courses in automotive preventative maintenance, brakes, steering and suspension, electrical systems, engine repair, engine performance, automatic transmission, manual transmission and differential & automotive HVAC. The hours completed in this course are aligned with ASE standards and are a base for the entry-level technician. Prerequisite: Automotive Technologies 2 and Instructor Approval
    • Advanced Automotive Technologies 4 This course is designed as the first course for the Advanced Automotive Technology Pathway. Students in this course will learn the basic skills needed to gain employment as an entry level automotive technician. Students will be exposed to courses in automotive preventative maintenance, brakes, steering and suspension, electrical systems, engine repair, engine performance, automatic transmission, manual transmission and differential & automotive HVAC. The hours completed in this course are aligned with ASE standards and are a base for the entry-level technician. Prerequisite: Automotive Technologies 3 and Instructor Approval
    • Advanced Automotive Technologies 5 This course is designed as the second course for the Advanced Automotive Technology Pathway. Students in this course will learn the basic skills needed to gain employment as an entry level automotive technician. Students will be exposed to courses in automotive preventative maintenance, brakes, steering and suspension, electrical systems, engine repair, engine performance, automatic transmission, manual transmission and differential & automotive HVAC. The hours completed in this course are aligned with ASE standards and are a base for the entry-level technician.  Prerequisite:  Advanced Automotive Technologies 4 and Instructor Approval 
    • Advanced Automotive Technologies 6 This course is designed as the third course for the Advanced Automotive Technology Pathway. Students in this course will learn the basic skills needed to gain employment as an entry level automotive technician. Students will be exposed to courses in automotive preventative maintenance, brakes, steering and suspension, electrical systems, engine repair, engine performance, automatic transmission, manual transmission and differential & automotive HVAC. The hours completed in this course are aligned with ASE standards and are a base for the entry-level technician. Prerequisite:  Advanced Automotive Technologies 5 and Instructor Approval
    • Automobile Service Technology 7 Students in this course will learn the basic skills needed to gain employment as a maintenance and light repair technician. This course will expose students to automotive preventative maintenance and servicing and replacing brakes. In addition, students will learn about steering and suspension components and general electrical system diagnosis, as well as learning electrical theory, performing basic tests, and determining necessary action. Students will learn how to evacuate and recharge air-conditioning systems using the proper refrigerant. The course standards are aligned with ASE/NATEF standards and are an excellent foundation for an entry-level technician. Prerequisite: Automobile Service Technology 6 and Instructor Approval 

    Automotive Internship Program Courses: Sudents that have successfully completed at least the first course in Automotive Technologies are eligible for paid Internships offered at local repair facilities and dealerships. The Automobile Service Technology Internships are elective courses for all Automobile Service Technology pathways. Students have the opportunity to practice finished work and develop problem solving skills. Students practice adaptability to job equipment and technology and exhibit progressive productivity and acceptable job performance. Mastery of these standards through project-based learning and leadership development activities of the Career and Technical Student Organizations will help prepare students with a competitive edge for the Automobile Service marketplace. Students seeking internships must apply directly through the Automotive Instructor. Successful applicants are automotive career focused, highly motivated, drug free, and possess a valid clean driving license record.

    • Automotive Service Technology Internship 1 The Automobile Service Technology Internship is an elective course for all Automobile Service Technology pathways. Students have the opportunity to practice finished work and develop problem solving skills. Students practice adaptability to job equipment and technology and exhibit progressive productivity and acceptable job performance. Mastery of these standards through project-based learning and leadership development activities of the Career and Technical Student Organizations will help prepare students with a competitive edge for the Automobile Service marketplace.  Prerequisite: Automotive Technologies 1 and Instructor Approval
    • Automotive Service Technology Internship 2 The Automobile Service Technology Internship is an elective course for all Automobile Service Technology pathways. Students have the opportunity to practice finished work and develop problem solving skills. Students practice adaptability to job equipment and technology and exhibit progressive productivity and acceptable job performance. Mastery of these standards through project-based learning and leadership development activities of the Career and Technical Student Organizations will help prepare students with a competitive edge for the Automobile Service marketplace.Prerequisite: Automotive Technologies 2 and Instructor Approval
    • Automotive Service Technology Internship 3 The Automobile Service Technology Internship is an elective course for all Automobile Service Technology pathways. Students have the opportunity to practice finished work and develop problem solving skills. Students practice adaptability to job equipment and technology and exhibit progressive productivity and acceptable job performance. Mastery of these standards through project-based learning and leadership development activities of the Career and Technical Student Organizations will help prepare students with a competitive edge for the Automobile Service marketplace. Prerequisite: Automotive Technologies 3 and Instructor Approval
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