• Social Studies Course Descriptions

     
    World History

    This year-long, one credit, required course provides students with a comprehensive, intensive study of major events and themes in world history. This course is taught either through a thematic or chronological approach covering major developments in all regions of the world. Students will study the earliest civilization all the way to globalization at the beginning of the 21st century connecting history and events through reasoning processes such as comparison and causation.


    World History Honors

    This year-long, one credit, required course provides students with a comprehensive, intensive study of major events and themes in world history. This course is taught either through a thematic or chronological approach covering major developments in all regions of the world. Students will study the earliest civilization all the way to globalization at the beginning of the 21st century connecting history and events through reasoning processes such as comparison and causation. Special attention is given to developing the critical thinking, test-taking, and writing skills needed to succeed in future Advanced Placement classes. Additional outside reading and document analysis are also incorporated into this course as part of the accelerated curriculum.


    Advanced Placement World History
    This year-long, one credit course conforms to the College Board topics for the Advanced Placement World History Examination.  It focuses on developing students’ abilities to think conceptually about world history from approximately 1200 CE to the present and apply historical thinking skills as they learn about the past. Five themes of equal importance — focusing on the environment, cultures, state-building, economic systems, and social structures — provide areas of historical inquiry for investigation throughout the course. AP World History encompasses the history of the five major geographical regions of the globe: Africa, the Americas, Asia, Europe, and Oceania, with special focus on historical developments and processes that cross multiple regions. This course requires thinking on an advanced level and strong verbal and written communication skills. Students are strongly encouraged to take the College Board AP World History Examination upon completion of this course. Significant outside reading and assignments should be anticipated as part of the course.
    United States History
    This year-long, one credit, required course provides students with a comprehensive, intensive study of major events and themes in United States history. Beginning with early European colonization, the course examines major events and themes throughout United States history. The course concludes with significant developments in the early 21st century. 
     
    *The state mandated Georgia Milestones End of Course Assessment is required and counts 20% of the student’s overall course grade.
    Advanced Placement United States History
    This year-long, one credit course conforms to the College Board topics for the Advanced Placement United States History Examination. It focuses on developing students’ abilities to think conceptually about U.S. history from approximately 1491 to the present and apply historical thinking skills as they learn about the past. Seven themes of equal importance — identity; peopling; politics and power; work, exchange, and technology; America in the world; environment and geography; and ideas, beliefs, and culture — provide areas of historical inquiry for investigation throughout the course. These require students to reason historically about continuity and change over time and make comparisons among various historical developments in different times and places. This course requires thinking on an advanced level and strong verbal and written communication skills. Students are strongly encouraged to take the College Board AP U.S. History Examination upon completion of this course. Significant outside reading and assignments should be anticipated as part of the course.
     
    *The state mandated Georgia Milestones End of Course Assessment is required and counts 20% of the student’s overall course grade. 
    American Government — One Semester (.5 credit)
    This one-semester, .5 credit, required course provides students with a background in the philosophy, functions, and structure of the United States government. Students examine the philosophical foundations of the United States government and how that philosophy developed. Students also examine the structure and function of the United States government and its relationship to states and citizens.
    Advanced Placement Government & Politics: United States—AP American Government
    This year-long, one credit course conforms to the College Board topics for the Advanced Placement Government and Politics: United States Examination. AP United States Government and Politics introduces students to key political ideas, institutions, policies, interactions, roles, and behaviors that characterize the political culture of the United States. The course examines politically significant concepts and themes, through which students learn to apply disciplinary reasoning assess causes and consequences of political events, and interpret data to develop evidence-based arguments. This course requires thinking on an advanced level and strong verbal and written communication skills. Students are strongly encouraged to take the College Board AP Government & Politics:United States Examination upon completion of this course. Significant outside reading and assignments should be anticipated as part of the course.
    Economics/Business — One Semester (.5 credit)
    This one-semester, .5 credit, required course provides students with a basic foundation in the field of economics. The course has five sections: fundamental concepts, microeconomics, macroeconomics, international economics, and personal finance. In each area, students are introduced to major concepts and themes concerning that aspect of economics. 
    *The state mandated Georgia Milestones End of Course Assessment is required and counts 20% of the student’s overall course grade.
    Advanced Placement Macroeconomics
    This year-long, one credit course conforms to College Board topics for the Advanced Placement Macroeconomics Examination. It is an introductory college-level course that focuses on the principles that apply to an economic system as a whole. The course places particular emphasis on the study of national income and price-level determination; it also develops students’ familiarity with economic performance measures, the financial sector, stabilization policies, economic growth, and international economics. Students learn to use graphs, charts, and data to analyze, describe, and explain economic concepts. This course requires thinking on an advanced level. Students are strongly encouraged to take the College Board AP Macroeconomics Examination upon completion of this course.
    *The state mandated Georgia Milestones End of Course Assessment is required and counts 20% of the student’s overall course grade.
    Advanced Placement Microeconomics
    This semester-long, 1/2 credit course conforms to College Board topics for the Advanced Placement Microeconomics Examination. It is an introductory college-level course that focuses on the principles of economics that apply to the functions of individual economic decision-makers. The course also develops students’ familiarity with the operation of product and factor markets, distributions of income, market failure, and the role of government in promoting greater efficiency and equity in the economy. Students learn to use graphs, charts, and data to analyze, describe, and explain economic concepts.This course requires thinking on an advanced level. Students are strongly encouraged to take the College Board AP Microeconomics Examination upon completion of this course. 

    World Geography — One Semester (.5) or Year Long (1.0)
    This one-semester or year-long course provides students with an introduction to both physical and cultural geography. After an introduction to geography, students study each major region of the world. For each region, students learn about the importance of the physical geography and its impact on the region’s development. Students study cultural aspects of each region and examine the influence of geography on the cultural development of each region.

    World Geography — One Semester (.5 credit)
    This one-semester, .5 credit, elective course, paired with Driver’s Education or another ½ credit elective course, provides students with an introduction to both physical and cultural geography. After an introduction to geography, students study each major region of the world. For each region, students learn about the importance of the physical geography and its impact on the region’s development. Students study cultural aspects of each region and examine the influence of geography on the cultural development of each region.


    Advanced Placement Human Geography
    This year-long, one credit, elective course conforms to the College Board topics for the Advanced Placement Human Geography Examination. This course is equivalent to an introductory college-level course in human geography. The course introduces students to the systematic study of patterns and processes that have shaped human understanding, use, and alteration of Earth’s surface. Students employ spatial concepts and landscape analysis to examine socioeconomic organization and its environmental consequences. They also learn about the methods and tools geographers use in their research and applications. The curriculum reflects the goals of the National Geography Standards (2012). Students are strongly encouraged to take the College Board AP Human Geography Examination upon the completion of this course. Significant outside reading and assignments should be anticipated as part of the course.


    Current Issues — One Semester (.5 credit)
    This one-semester, .5 credit, elective course addresses the major socioeconomic and political events of the Post-World War II era. Students will study the following: current social, economic, and political issues; sources of information; the interaction of technology and society; the relationship between the environment and energy; criminal behavior; health and social welfare programs; education; immigration; human rights; issues surrounding the development and use of weapons of mass destruction; ideological and political conflict; world economic issues and international trade. A good historical understanding of these topics and well-developed communication skills (both oral and written) are strongly recommended for this course.


    Individual and the Law — One Semester (.5 credit)
    This one-semester, .5 credit, elective course allows students to analyze the foundations and functions of the American legal system. This course examines the role of individuals, conflict resolution, legal concepts and terminology, types of laws, statutory law in Georgia, criminal law and procedures, the individual’s relationship to the law, the federal court system, Georgia’s court system, consumer and family law, the age of majority, driver’s licensing, and major federal court decisions. This course aims to integrate and reinforce K-12 social studies skills.


    Psychology – 11-12th Grades — One Semester (.5 credit)
    This one-semester, .5 credit, elective course is the scientific study of behavior and mental processes. It is a unique science that often necessitates the use of special measurements and research methods. The course has four sections: psychological foundations and research; biological foundations; change in behavior and cognition; and variability of behavior among individual and groups.


    Sociology – 11-12th Grades — One Semester (.5 credit)
    This one-semester, .5 credit, elective course is an introductory study in sociology, the study of social behavior and the organization of human society. Students will learn about the historical development of the field of sociology and the procedures for conducting research in sociology. Students will also learn the importance and role of culture, social structure, socialization, and social change in today’s society.


    Georgia Academic Decathlon
    In this year-long, one credit course, students work as a team to master a set curriculum of information in the following areas, Language and Literature, Social Science, Economics, Science, Art, Music, Mathematics, Written Expression, Public Speaking and Interviewing.  The goal of the curriculum is to create a well-rounded student who can express himself both verbally and in writing.  Some of the skills students master in the course are how to think critically, how to interview, how to write and deliver a prepared speech, how to apply knowledge from other subjects to the set curriculum, and how to work as part of a team.


    Humanities
    This year-long, one credit course investigates philosophical ideas and values in human affairs with history and philosophy as the basis. It provides an interdisciplinary approach that embraces literature, language, composition, music and art, science and mathematics. Provides the curriculum connections that encourage analytical, comparative, and critical thinking skills development.


    Ethnic Studies
    This year-long, one credit course examines the diversity of American society.  It focuses on various ethnic groups that make up the American population. It covers cultural orientation, contributions, and cultural perspectives of each group. It integrates and reinforces social studies skills.


    United States History in Film
    This one-semester, .5 credit, elective course that explores United States History through film. This course includes analysis and interpretation of events through both print and film.


    Advanced Placement Government and Politics: Comparative - AP Comparative Government
    This year-long, one credit, elective course conforms to the College Board topics for the Advanced Placement Government and Politics: Comparative Government examination. This course introduces students to key political ideas, institutions, policies, interactions, roles, and behaviors that characterize the political culture of the United States. The course examines politically significant concepts and themes, through which students learn to apply disciplinary reasoning assess causes and consequences of political events, and interpret data to develop evidence-based arguments. This course requires thinking on an advanced level. Students are strongly encouraged to take the College Board AP Comparative Government and Politics Examination at the completion of this course. Significant outside reading and assignments should be anticipated as a part of the course.


    Advanced Placement European History
    This year-long, one credit, elective course conforms to the College Board topics for the Advanced Placement European History examination. This course focuses on developing students' abilities to think conceptually about European history from approximately 1450 to the present and apply historical thinking skills as they learn about the past.  Five themes of equal importance--Interaction of Europe and the World, Poverty and Prosperity, Objective Knowledge and Subjective Visions, States and Other Institutions of Power, and Individual and Society--provide areas of historical inquiry for investigations throughout the course.  These require students to reason historically about continuity and change over time and make comparisons among various historical developments in different times and places.  Students are strongly encouraged to take the College Board AP European History Examination at the completion of this course. Significant outside reading and assignments should be anticipated as a part of the course.


    Advanced Placement Psychology
    This year-long, one credit, elective course conforms to the College Board topics for the Advanced Placement Psychology Examination. This course introduces students to the systematic and scientific study of human behavior and mental processes. While considering the psychologists and studies that have shaped the field, students explore and apply psychological theories, key concepts, and phenomena associated with such topics as biological bases of behavior, sensation and perception, learning and cognition, motivation, developmental psychology, testing and individual differences, treatment of abnormal behavior, and social psychology.  Throughout the course, students employ psychological research methods, including ethical considerations, as they use scientific method, analyze bias, evaluate claims and evidence, and effectively communicate ideas.  Students are strongly encouraged to take the College Board AP Psychology Examination at the completion of this course. Significant outside reading and assignments should be anticipated as a part of the course.