• English Course Descriptions

     


    9th Grade Literature and Composition

    This course focuses on a study of literary genres and informational texts.  Students develop initial understanding of both the structure and the meaning of a literary work and explore the effect of the literary form in regards to interpretation. Students will also read across the curriculum to develop academic and personal interests in different subjects. In conjunction with reading skills, students will demonstrate competency in a variety of writing genres: argumentative, informational/expository, and narrative. They will also engage in research, timed writings, and the writing process. Instruction in language conventions will occur within the context of reading, writing, and speaking, rather than in isolation. Students will also demonstrate an understanding of speaking and listening for a variety of purposes.
     
    *The state mandated Georgia Milestones End of Course Assessment is required and counts 20% of the student’s overall course grade.
    9th Grade Literature and Composition (Honors)
    This course focuses on a study of literary genres and informational texts.  Students develop initial understanding of both the structure and the meaning of a literary work and explore the effect of the literary form in regards to interpretation. Students will also read across the curriculum to develop academic and personal interests in different subjects. In conjunction with reading skills, students will demonstrate competency in a variety of writing genres: argumentative, informational/expository, and narrative. They will also engage in research, timed writings, and the writing process. Instruction in language conventions will occur within the context of reading, writing, and speaking, rather than in isolation. Students will also demonstrate an understanding of speaking and listening for a variety of purposes. Other topics and skills specific to preparing students for the rigors of an Advanced Placement (AP) course will be integrated throughout the course.
     
    *The state mandated Georgia Milestones End of Course Assessment is required and counts 20% of the student’s overall course grade.
    10th Grade Literature and Composition
    This course builds upon the 9th Grade Literature and Composition course through a continued focus on a study of literary genres and informational texts. Students will develop an understanding that theme is what relates literature to life and that themes are recurring in the literary world, and students will explore the effect of themes in regard to interpretation. Students will also read across the curriculum to develop academic and personal interests in different subjects. While the focus of composition studies is writing argument in tenth grade literature, students will also demonstrate competency in informative/expository and narrative writing genres. They will also engage in research, timed writings, and the writing process. Instruction in language conventions will occur within the context of reading, writing, and speaking, rather than in isolation. Students will also demonstrate an understanding of speaking and listening for a variety of purposes. 
    10th Grade Literature and Composition (Honors)
    This course builds upon the 9th Grade Literature and Composition course through a continued focus on a study of literary genres and informational texts. Students will develop an understanding that theme is what relates literature to life and that themes are recurring in the literary world, and students will explore the effect of themes in regard to interpretation. Students will also read across the curriculum to develop academic and personal interests in different subjects. While the focus of composition studies is writing argument in tenth grade literature, students will also demonstrate competency in informative/expository and narrative writing genres. They will also engage in research, timed writings, and the writing process. Instruction in language conventions will occur within the context of reading, writing, and speaking, rather than in isolation. Students will also demonstrate an understanding of speaking and listening for a variety of purposes.  Other topics and skills specific to preparing students for the rigors of an Advanced Placement (AP) course will be integrated throughout the course.
    American Literature and Composition
    This course is a survey of American Literature from the Colonial Period to the Modern Era.  It builds upon the 10th Grade Literature and Composition course through a focus on the acquisition of higher level reading, writing, speaking, listening, and language skills. This course focuses on the study of American literature and informational texts, writing modes and genres, and essential conventions for reading, writing, and speaking. Students will read a variety of informational and literary texts in all genres and modes of discourse. In addition, students will read across the curriculum to develop their academic and personal interests in different subjects. While expository writing is the focus in American literature, students will also demonstrate competency in argumentative and narrative genres. They will also engage in research, timed writing, and the writing process. Instruction in language conventions will occur within the context of reading, writing, and speaking. Students will also demonstrate an understanding of speaking and listening for a variety of purposes. 
     
    *The state mandated Georgia Milestones End of Course Assessment is required and counts 20% of the student’s overall course grade.
    AP English Language and Composition is an introductory college-level composition course. Students cultivate their understanding of writing and rhetorical arguments through reading, analyzing, and writing texts as they explore topics like rhetorical situation, claims and evidence, reasoning and organization, and style.
     
    *The state mandated Georgia Milestones End of Course Assessment is required and counts 20% of the student’s overall course grade.
    AP Seminar is a foundational course that engages students in cross-curricular conversations that explore the complexities of academic and real-world topics and issues by analyzing divergent perspectives. Students learn to investigate a problem or issue, analyze arguments, compare different perspectives, synthesize information from multiple sources, and work alone and in a group to communicate their ideas.

    Advanced Composition
    This course focuses on the writing process (planning, drafting, and revising). Students will focus on different writing genres and organizational structures: expository, argument, narrative, descriptive, comparison-contrast, exemplification, process analysis, classification, cause and effect, and definition. Advanced language skills (grammar and usage) will be a major component of this class. An emphasis on research is also required.

    British Literature and Composition
    This course is a survey of British Literature from the Anglo-Saxon Period to the present.  It builds upon the American Literature and Composition course and focuses on literature and informational texts, writing modes and genres, and essential conventions for reading, writing, and speaking. Students will develop an understanding of chronological context and the relevance of period structures in British literature. They will also develop an understanding of the ways the period of literature affects its structure and how the chronology of a work affects its meaning. Students will encounter a variety of informational and literary texts and read texts in all genres and modes of discourse. They will also read across the curriculum to develop their academic and personal interests in different subjects. While the continued focus is expository writing in British literature, students will also demonstrate competency in argumentative and narrative genres. Students will engage in research, timed writing, and the writing process as well as develop an understanding of the impact that technology has on writing. Instruction in language conventions will occur within the context of reading, writing, and speaking, rather than in isolation. Students will also demonstrate an understanding of speaking and listening skills for a variety of purposes.
     

    Dramatic Writing (Film, Television, and Theatre I)
    This course applies skills to culminate in creating and developing dramatic writing for theatrical media with special emphasis on film and television.  Students will develop “writerly stance” by reading, viewing, and analyzing texts and visual media from a writer’s point of view, with focus on understanding the construction process and applying the conventions of standard English grammar and usage.

    *This course meets fourth English Language Arts core requirement and a Fine Arts elective.


    AP English Literature and Composition is an introductory college-level literary analysis course. Students cultivate their understanding of literature through reading and analyzing texts as they explore concepts like character, setting, structure, perspective, figurative language, and literary analysis in the context of literary works.
     

    AP Research, the second course in the AP Capstone experience, allows students to deeply explore an academic topic, problem, issue, or idea of individual interest. Students design, plan, and implement a yearlong investigation to  address a research question. Through this inquiry, they further the skills they acquired in the AP Seminar course by learning research methodology, employing ethical research practices, and accessing, analyzing, and synthesizing information.  Students reflect on their skill development, document their processes, and curate the artifacts of their scholarly work through a process and reflection portfolio. The course culminates in an academic paper of 4,000–5,000 words  (accompanied by a performance, exhibit, or product where applicable) and a presentation with an oral defense.

    Journalism I
    This course focuses on an introduction to journalistic writing through an analysis of newspapers, yearbooks, literary magazines, and broadcast journalism.  A concentration on the following components of journalistic writing may include, but is not limited to, the interview process; evaluating sources; purpose, structure, and diction in writing; and training in the various technology used in publishing. Students should participate in news gathering, the study of journalism ethics and laws, and the aspects of copy writing, editing, and revising. If a publication is produced, the students will be exposed to the process of publishing and how to manage a successful publication. 

    Journalism II
    The course offers an advanced study of journalistic writing. Skills from Journalism I are continued as students focus on a more intense analysis of print and broadcast journalism.  This course requires more critical thinking and more in-depth writing as related to newspaper, yearbook and/or literary magazine. Students will also be expected to gain more independence in the daily tasks of producing a publication. 

    Journalism III
    This course is an extension of Journalism I and II; students will enhance and hone the skills in journalistic writing, with a main focus on analysis of print and broadcast publications. An in-depth coverage of level-two topics will serve as the main premise. Students will evaluate and apply skills appropriately and efficiently to various publication opportunities and activities, both in-school and out-of-school. 

    Journalism IV
    This course is designed for students who have mastered skills in Journalism III. Students will publish journalistic articles as appropriate either in a school newspaper (print or electronic), yearbook or literary magazine. The range of opportunities to apply skills will be increased and students are expected to manage all aspects of the publishing process with the delivery of a final publication. 

    Mythology (Greek, Roman, Norse)
    This course introduces the importance of myths and tales of classical mythology, focusing on a comparative study of plot, characters, themes, and figurative devices. The course emphasizes the following: critical and analytical skills, vocabulary development, a study of the influences of Greek, Roman, and Norse word origins on the English language, and composition. The study of the relationship between people and their societies is a major emphasis, along with the impact of mythology on the literary world. Writing exploration through media literacy and viewing will be a focus in this course.  This course reflects grade-level appropriate Georgia Standards of Excellence.

    Oral/Written Communication (Speech)
    This course focuses on developing public speaking skills. Students will identify effective methods for arranging ideas and information in written form and then convert the written form into an effective oral delivery. The course focuses on critical thinking, organizing ideas, researching counter viewpoints, and communicating appropriately for different audiences and purposes. Students will analyze professional speeches to enhance their knowledge of solid speech writing.