• World History

    This year-long, one credit, required course provides students with a comprehensive, intensive study of major events and themes in world history. This course is taught either through a thematic approach covering major developments in all regions of the world. Students will study the earliest civilization all the way to globalization at the beginning of the 21st century connecting history and events through reasoning processes such as comparison and causation.

     

     Advanced Placement World History


    This year-long, one credit course conforms to the College Board topics for the Advanced Placement World History Examination.  It focuses on developing students’ abilities to think conceptually about world history from approximately 8000 BCE to the present and apply historical thinking skills as they learn about the past. Five themes of equal importance — focusing on the environment, cultures, state-building, economic systems, and social structures — provide areas of historical inquiry for investigation throughout the course. AP World History encompasses the history of the five major geographical regions of the globe: Africa, the Americas, Asia, Europe, and Oceania, with special focus on historical developments and processes that cross multiple regions. This course requires thinking on an advanced level and strong verbal and written communication skills. Students are strongly encouraged to take the College Board AP World History Examination upon completion of this course. Significant outside reading and assignments should be anticipated as part of the course.

     

    American History

    This yearlong, one credit required course serves as a comprehensive, intensive study of major events and themes in United States History. The course curriculum includes a survey of the history of our country beginning with the Age of Exploration and ending with the early 21 st century. Topics covered include colonial America, the American Revolution, the Critical Period, the Federalist Era, the Jeffersonian Era, the Age of Jackson, 19th Century Reform Movements, Sectionalism & the Civil War, Reconstruction, the Industrial Revolution, the Gilded Age, the Progressive Era, World War I, the Great Depression, World War II, the Cold War, the Civil Rights Movement, the Vietnam War, and recent events from the 1980s through the beginnings of the 21st century. A state mandated End of Course Test is required and counts 20% of the student’s overall course grade.

     

    Advanced Placement United States History

    This yearlong, one credit course conforms to the College Board topics for the Advanced Placement United States History examination. This college level curriculum covers the topics of pre-Colombian societies, European discovery and settlement, colonial America, the American Revolution, the Constitution and the New Republic, the Age of Jefferson, nationalism, sectionalism, territorial expansion, the Civil War, Reconstruction, Industrialization, the progressive Era, World War I, the Great Depression & the New Deal, World War II, the Cold War, the Civil Rights Movement, the Vietnam War, and recent events from the 1980's through the beginnings of the 21st Century. The course is organized around the themes of American diversity, American identity, culture, demographic change, economics transformations, environment, globalization, politics and citizenship, reform, religion, slavery and its legacy, and war & diplomacy. A state mandated End of Course Test is required and counts 20% of the student’s overall course grade. Students are strongly encouraged to take the College Board AP U.S. History examination at the completion of this course in May. Significant outside reading and assignments should be anticipated as a part of the course.

     

     
    This yearlong, one credit elective course conforms to the College Board topics for the Advanced Placement Psychology examination. This course is designed to introduce students to the systematic and scientific study of the behavior and mental processes of human beings and other animals. Students will be exposed to the psychological facts, principles, and phenomena associated with each of the major subfields within psychology. Course topics include: Psychological History and Approaches, Research Methods, Biological Bases of Behavior, Sensation and Perception, States of Consciousness, Learning, Cognition, Motivation and Emotion, Developmental Psychology, Testing and Individual Differences, Abnormal Psychology, Treatment of Psychological Disorders, and Social Psychology. Students are strongly encouraged to take the College Board AP Comparative Government and Politics examination at the completion of this course in May. Significant outside reading and assignments should be anticipated as a part of the course.

     

    Future Social Studies Course Offerings for the 2020-2021 School Year

    Economics

    American Government

    Advanced Placement U.S. Government and Politics

    Advanced Placement Macroeconomics

     

    AAI Coonections to Social Studies

     

    US History CTAE Connections